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Open 7 days 7St. A naw one's taken the Half Note 's old pramiset. Proof of the Puddbtg-lst Ave at 64th. Dine to the songs and piano playing of Count Itato. And guHarlst Ted Angonstaras stroNs Has moved waatward and kept Hs jazz personality. Slxl8h First Ave at 88th. Sammy Benskin at the piano Wed thru Sun.

Qood food til Jazz pianist Michael White provkjes the entertainment here in the heart ol the theater district, and the restaurant is noted for its steaks CI Sub Plot-1 1 1 W 46th St. This new small club is an adjunct of the American Place Theater and features nightly entertainment. The OiMln E 48th, nr 2nd. Lovely room with exquiiiM Frsnoh tood and Oana Bradtoy at tha piano from 7;30 to Quitar aohM On wa a kand tt; hootan a ntoa and contemporary took groupa.

Food from 8 pm Mon- days, it's tne always historic, haroto Thad Jonaa Mai Lewis band 1. Soft atmosphere, sawdust floors, amber lights, "boss" soul food Your Father's Mustache-7th Ave S at 10th. Dhialand jazz OR Dancing nightly, seven days a week and spadai champagne brunches on wee k end s.

Tliara'a a Garden of Eden nom tor dancing Pub wRh brick walla, oM pieluraa, att. Dining, brunch; and dancing from 9 to 4 ajn. A Totebook that takes you away from the madding crowd Wilderness Skiing Thousands of skilers across America are disenchanted with the high costs and crowded slopes of the developed resort. Now they are turning to tfie ad- venture of Nordic cross-country and Alpine touring and the free- dom to discover a resort of one s very own.

This Tote descrlt es techniques, equlpnnent and where to go. At your local book or aki shop. We have more Jamaica to give. A beau- tiful balconied room. And fabulous entertain- ment. Box, Runaway Bay, Jimalci, W.

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Workshops meet for 12 sessions. A tng friendly, groovy place, where people nnix easily.

Drinks available, but there's no pressure to buy anything Nautical atmos- phere, dancing and dinner nightly from 5: A multi-leveled restaurant with discotheque dancing on a suspended dance floor and a varied menu. Sun thru Thur, 11 a. And so Is the Hall of Afhcan Mammals. And so is the Hall of the Eskimos.

Sat at 2 p. Playhouse, A W 14th St Has spawned plenty of on-Bdway talent. Fka, Water, Stone and Air-Stones and songs gattv ered from all time throughout the world. For ages 7 to 1 1. Jan Hus, E 74th LE Ages 5 to 9. A Moofy kit to each child or GR Muse Bedford Ave, Bklyn.

An exhibition of children's prints, live animal programs, see and touch, science programs Closed Mondays Botanical Garden-Every day, 1 1 a. A tropical rain forest with exotk: Southern Blvd at th St, Bronx Please Touch-Reconstruction of a 17th century Dutch home furnished with antK]ue objects the children may handle. Every Saturday at 2: Museum of the City of N Y.

Seals and lions and elephiants, barrels of monkeys and loads of bears, all sizes and colors. Museum, 5th Ave at rd Sat and Sun at 1 p. Sat and Sun at 2: Sky RInk-Lovely pleasant ks-skating spot for the kkte with live organ music and excellent Instruction if necessary. Sessions for children and adults Satur- days and Sundays from 3 p.

Every Sat and Sun at 2 p. Eastern Parkway and Vanderbilt Ave Turnabouts-Audience partcipation slxiws for cfiildren. Conven- tion and Visitors Bureau, 90 E 42nd St, Let New York Magazine's Ad- vertising Information Service tell you "where to buy what you've seen advertised in our pages. Repeat of Thursday's program. Biuea Variations, Philharmonic Hall at 8.

John Lee Hooker and Mose Allison. Pierre Boulez; sol- oists: Carnegie Recital Hall at 8. Lir coln Center Litjrary- Museum at 6: Brooklyn College at 8. Concert Socials, Studki 58 Playhouse, W 58th at 8: Lenny Mandel and Rae Metzger. School, 46 Barrow St CH at 8 free. Eric Anderson, folk-rock singer, Alk: Paul Dunkel, flutist, Carnegie Recital Hall at 8: Hunter College Playhouse at 2: Chopin Anthony Gennarelli, violinist with string trio.

New- York Histoncal Society. Jazz, with vocalist Lady Helene. Medieval and Renaissance English court music for voice and viola. Peter's Lu- theran Church, 54th and Lexington Ave at 7: The World of Jazz, jazz vespers, St. Central Park West and 65th at 5 free. Session of jazz and free improvi- sation. Evelyn Man- dac, soprano; Birgit Rnnila.

Couperin, Le Roux, Rameau. Town Hall at 8. Carnegie Recital Hall at 8: Rey De La Torre, guitarist. Alice Tully Hall at 8. Lincoln Center Li- brary-Museum at free. David Bar- man, piano; Itzhak Perlman, violin, Mendelssohn. Madison Square Garden, Seventh Ave at 33rd Lincoln Center, Alice Tully Hall. Library-Museum, Amsterdam Avenue New York State Theater. Lincoln Center Plaza TR Juiiliard Ttieater, Lincoln Center Plaza Town Hall, W 43rd JU Casual Trarelerf A smart two-piece pant outfit topped -with a casual leather-look shirt jacket.

In black for sizes 8 to Jn wWi neds, Uumpet, drums and electric bass. Haiv- uoi GMw, Mlaa. ToUt Conduelon Bahr; dbactor Aoyama: Conduo- tOR Lavkiaf dhactor. Conductor Lewir, dbaelor Taveinia; de- signor: Unda Schoen- leld and Joanne WIesner. Park West and 79th at 1 Waiter Darby Bannsrd-Rubin, 49 W Sue Daykln-Bowery, Graana St no tsl.

Adolf Dehn-Kennedy, 20 E 56th Joan Gardner Mercer St John Qrietan-Komblee, 58 E 79th Densely oolorod abaMcl paintings. Soulplura k bronza and niekal-branzo. Qaorga Sagal-Janis, 6 W S79l 9. Wayne Slephana Piktoa St Styrofoam and urethane foam paintings and sculpture. Abraham Walkowttz-Zabrtslcle, 29 W 57th Wundermart-Roko, 90 E 10th GR Bart Carpenter-Zabriskie, 29 W 57th Dorothy Dehner-Willard, 29 E 72nd Do Koonlng-Fourcade, Droll Inc.

Paintings, sculpture, drawings and litho- graphs from to Land- scapes, seascapes and still lites. Max Ernst-La Boetie by appointment Etchings from First U S exhibition of Aubusson tapes- tries, designed by the French sculptor, whose tapes- try designs reflect the geometrk: Second Ave and Hammarskjold Plaza Edward Gorey-Gotham Book Mart.

Posters from the 20's and 30's. Robert Kullcke-Komblee, 58 E 79th Dennis Loy-Westbroadway, W Broadway Louis Lozowick-Oain, Madison Ave Jules Olltskt-lmages by appointment. Pablo Picasao-Knoedler, 21 E 70th Sculpture in bronze, indef. International Naive Primitive Painters, including works by Bombois. Tusnelda ar d Fasanella. Sculpture and paintings dating from the 3rd century B.

First Street Prince St No tel. Figurative draw- ings by gallery members. Hutehlnson Greene St Ida Horowitz and Mildred Stanley. Pratt Manhattan Center Park Ave Prince Street Prince St Sahienber Madison Ave BU Draw- ings and wori s on paper by Balthus, Delaunay, Feininger. Moore, Picasso and Schiele. SalmagundM7 Fifth Ave Annual oil and sculpture exhibition by members.

What could be happier news for the whole family than that the all-new edition of Ice Capades will be in our midst for nineteen joyous performances from the 9th through the 21st-and that it's truly gayer, more spectacular, more exciting than ever! Just for for instances, it proudly presents the ice world's most charming and talented young couple, Jo Jo Starbuck and Ken Shelley, the three time U.

Don't wait —get your tickets now! Great entertainment at the Felt Forum too. From the 4th through the 14th, you may share the delights of the world-acclaimed Grand triusic Hall of Israel with its all-star cast and full orchestra, featuring not only lovely songstress Shoshana Damari but also special guest host Myron Cohen with his limitless fund of uproarious anecdotes, plus a fabulous array of singers, dancers and entertainers.

It's a special limited en- gagement celebrating Israel's 25th anni- versary—indeed an occasion long to be remembered! The Jerry Quarry Randy Neumann heavyweight match on the 5th; the Camper and Trailer Show in the Ro- tunda from the 20th through the 28th; Neil Young In Concert in the Arena on the 23rd; the traditional Wanamaker Millrose Games on the 26th with some of America's and the world's top track and field record- holders; and a big college basketball triple-header starting at 12 noon on the 27th-the line-up; Rutgers-Columbia.

Meanwhile, look what the Knicks and Rangers are doing this month in the way of home encounters: R Wooster St Adam E 73rd BU Artemis Easl Lexington Ave A Straw of Hands W 72nd No tel. Pottery, macrame, photography, leatherwork, crochet, draw- ings, batik, patchwork and jewelry, iodef.

Works by Alderters, Glykokokalos. Bass, Gould, McPherson, Orsini. Cttase E 64th LE Cooper Prince St Falrtree Madison Ave Feiden E 10th OR Works by important American artists, including Baskln. Galerte L'Afrtque Madison Ave Gallery at 2t Fitth Ave MU Graphics by Jim Dine and David Hockney. Art of the Eskimo: Goldowsl y Madison Ave LE Paintings showing the cTianging images of 19th century Amerkan art.

Hoffman West Broadway Holiday Gallery of Student Art paintings, prints, sculpture. Janls-6 W 57th Old Masters of the 20th century including works by Braque. Matisse, Picasso and Vasarely. Works by gallery artists: Lemon Qeranlum W 98th Prints and drawings by Kitty Savage, Joyce Biegeleisen.

Merrin E 54th PL Myers W 57th Omnia W 55th Drawings, watercolors and paintings by Italian and Italian-Amencan artists: American and European posters, bill- boards from European museums, Indef. Poster P1ace W 53rd American and European posters, indef. Small paintings in oil and watercolor. Seymour E 57th PL Society of lllustrators-1 28 E 63rd TE Solomon Madison Ave Staempfll E 77th The Art of Drawing: Ward-Nasss Prince St Washbunv Madison Ave RH Weinger E 57th Weintraub Madison Ave TR West Slde W 72nd after 1: Westbetlt Bank St We8tbroadway West Bdway Rub and Goldfrank, indef.

Focus W 74th Kodak Sixth Ave UgM Madison Ave Long Island Universlty-ses Flattxjsh Ave Photograpfis by Rocco Galatioto. Midtown V E 14th Photographs by vromen photograpfiers — a two part exhibition. Naii rug E 6eth BU Photographs of women by AtMgail Heyman. Portogallo Sixth Ave Witl ln E 60th Environ- mental Intormation Center, open Sats from Hall of Ocean Life and Biology of Fishes: North American Indian Portraits: Shells, a Pictorial Tribute: Gold, Frankincense and Myrrh: Marsupials — TTie Other Mammals: Street- cars and Trains: Around, Over, Under and Through: Thiebaud, Oliveira, Goode, Ruscha.

Toys by Artists and Antique Toys: Money from B C. Tue-Sun ; closed Mon. Frick Collectlon-I E 70th Tues-Sat , Sun , closed Mon. Eva Hesse— A Memorial Exhibition: Tues-Sat , Sun , Wed eve , closed Mon. Holiday Crafts and Graphics: The Fabric of the State: Mon-Fri , Sat , Sun The Art ot Joinery diests.

Artifacts from tfte Al-Hiba excavatkin. Marcel Breuer—A Retros- pective Annual Baroque Christmas Tree and Creche display: German Master Drawings ol the 19th Century: Mon-Sat , Sun Musmim of Modem Art-1 1 W 53rd Fri, Sat , Thur , Sun Departing from our own pier, enjoy the famous "Yacht Pineapple", a 40 ft.

Twin Diesel Sport Fisherman. Roberi Reid Associates, Inc. Control a sports syndicate, an entertainment empire, a real estate monopoly! So what if you're suddenly in hock for 10 G's? You're holding Lassie for ransom and MGM knows it! Open 7 Days Now At: It's called our Advertising Informa- tion Service.

Specifically, for radios or televisions, we'll tell you what models are in which stores; for a restaurant, we'll read menu and price and tell you what credit cards are accepted; for a hotel, we'll describe accommodations. For Advertising Information Service, call or African Textiles and Decorative Arts: Sun , closed Mon.

Sun, Tue-Frl , Sat , ckised Mon. Birds ol America by John James Audubon: Mon-Sat , closed Sun. Languages of the World: Oocu- ments — Famous and Infamous: PlerpfOnt Morgan Ubrary E 36th Tues-Sat ; Sun Studio Museum-Fifth Ave at th Tue, Thurs, Fri, , Sat, Sun, Whitney Museum-Madison Ave at 75th Daily , Tue, , Sun and holidays Sam Francis — Paintings: MSG Rangers vs Pittsburgh.

Post time 8 p. Quinielas on the 3rd. City EX at 8: Art Talka-A chance to see selected exhibitkms in New York museums and galleries. Call or write for specifics. Free Events In NYC Information Numtier-To leam about free programs in parks, museums, libraries and streets throughout the rive boroughs, both indoors and outdoors, call , 10 am.

Sales and Bargains There is a sale going on daily in New York, often on items that were overpriced In the first place. Our definltkKi ol a sale is a minimum 30 per cent mark- down on standard-priced brand-name goods, less In rare cases. Unmarked items that sell tor less than brand-name lookalikes or goods sold in discount houses or manufacturers' outlets, will occasionally ap- pear in this column as bargains.

Round silver candy bowl , now t6S. Solo ondo wlian ainek is gone. Fabrlcs-Uptiolstery and drapery fabrics mostly left- over decorators' stock sold below wholesale prices. Shoes-Store-wide sale at this discount shoe store. Stereo Equlpment-Store-wide clearance aala at Ms discount house. Memorex C90 blank cassettes. Al al Chkiaiilo Audto Electronics.

M ap lewoo d. New Yorkers buying here will save the 7 per cent New York sales tax and the 5 per cent Jersey sales tax provkled the equipment is brought to New Yort. Country French antique-green pigmented oak. V Chair Corpi, Third Ave near 58th, 3rd floor Plakl pants by Trousers Up, wool.

Wool aMrt by H. Reader Tip-Handbags sold at wholesale prices, both domestk: America tfre Beautiful Fund. Amertean Brotherixxxf for the Blind. Topeka; come Home Our Pvtaoneia. San Dfagoj ffia Hope School. These organi- zatrans are actively soliciting funds in New York. Pafadv-'ki school ada— Ustod aavaral degrees alMr bar name, such as Doctor of Laws.

Doctor of Bduca M o n , Doctor of Science, etc.. This includes, among ottiers. For a oopy of the dkectory wdto to the Heakh Sarvtoea Adirtnl sbaB o n. Office of Pubte InforiTtatkm. The kkti dtkiuniafilk kte affadi ot 8ia laauHbig uausiHnvmn. Library, Bdway And where to find it in New York. Give up tfiose long, scenic subway rides from antique shop to antique sinop all over New York.

Come to 4 1 5 East 53rd Street. Othienwlse known as antique hieaven. Attach pnsent label with old addicss and enter new address above. By Barry Tarshis ". Wall Street tends to go bananas over sports. The really intriguing part, though, was that all three men — Jack Stroud, Bob Simms and Carl Braun — were former professional athletes: This raised to six the number of one- time professional jocks in the Bear, Steams stable the other three are for- mer fet fullback Bill Mathis; former University of North Carolina — and for a brief time a Syracuse National — bas- ketball stalwart Tom Kearns, and for- mer New York Knickerbocker Larry Friend , and led a broker to quip one evening in Oscar's, "Any time anybody at Bear, Stearns says, 'Check the tape,' half the guys in the trading room look down at their ankles.

Weld ; and one Allie Sherman, the former field general in the House of Mara, who, after pondering offers in and out of football for two years, recently joined the investment management firm of Sanford C. It is true that the fraternity of cur- rent and former pro athletes on Wall Street is not all that vast, but what it lacks in numbers, it makes up in im- pact. As you might expect from an in- dustry overwhelmingly male.

Wall Street tends to go bananas over sports in general. A substantial number of brokers are pretty fair athletes them- selves — former high school and college lettermen who still manage to stay in trim on the tennis or squash courts, or in the sweaty and often quarrel- some weeknight pickup basketball games at the Downtown or New York Athletic Club — and many of them dis- cuss what they do as if they were still in uniform.

If I called up eighteen guys and got eighteen refusals, I'd think, 'Okay, I'm 0 for 18, but I'm not going to give up. You have to be competitive. You have to win. One recent Merrill Lynch survey re- vealed that the most common of com- mon denominators among the firm's biggest producers was a "strong in- terest in spectator sports, especially football. College jocks, yes, particularly Ivy Leaguers, but not anybody who had ever actually made a living at it.

As Buddy Young, the former professional football player who now works as a special assistant to Pete Rozelle in the N. As for the ballplayers, most of us didn't have the vaguest idea of what Wall Street was all about, and with the kind of money we were mak- ing, it didn't matter. League officials, not surprisingly, in- sist that their efforts simply reflected a concern they feel for ballplayers not just as athletes, but as people.

Some ob- servers, though, felt the whole thing smacked of paternalism — a new means by which pro athletes could be made to feel beholden to their team and their league during a period when such loyal- ties were being severely tested by seduc- tive contracts.

A few cynics even went so far as to suggest that the real motive behind these discussions was the hope that if athletes had better-paying jobs in the off-season, their hang-ups about long-term security and their accelerat- ing salary demands might be eased. In any event, possibly because many pro franchise owners and league officials are themselves active investors i.

And here was this pool of exciting, and, for the most part, college-educated guys who seemed bright and ambitious. We figured there was nothing to lose. What's wrong with an athlete taking advantage of his status? Is it different from using school ties or family connections?

It's difficult to say just how many pro athletes have been interviewed by Wall Street firms over the past six years, but estimates put the figure well in excess of A good percentage, naturally, came down simply out of curiosity, but the majority interviewed seemed to have a genuine interest in establishing some sort of post-athletic career, and, in some cases, were sur- prisingly desperate about it.

There was a 30 NEW YORK definite correlation between the way a particular guy's career was going and the confidence he showed during the interview. I really felt sorry for some of the athletes. They seemed so naive, so uninformed, so insecure. I never real- ized until I started interviewing these guys just how fragile an athlete's ego really is.

Some athletes were flat-out mortified by such a paltry figure. Actually, though, basketball bores me. And only a small percent- age of the pro athletes who've remained are still with the firms that originally hired them. All four of the name athletes who were originally hired by Shearson, Hammill — Tucker Frederickson, Marlin Mc- Keever, Mike Ditka, and Bill Singer — are either out of the industry or with another firm.

If you make special considerations, you run the risk of alienating the rest of the salesmen. If you treat him like everybody else, you run the risk that some other firm — a smaller firm, usually — is going to make him a better deal. What's hap- pened now is that some of the larger firms have run into this problem, and we're all being extra careful about who we hire.

I've been in on meetings where I could sense the person I was talking to was just waiting for me to start talking about tennis, and that's why my policy is to never bring it up, unless the other guy mentions it first and, even then, to underplay it. Bill Mathis no longer wears his Super Bowl Championship ring when he makes business calls — not since word filtered down from Bear, Stearns brass that somebody in Mathis's southeastern territory possibly a Balti- more fan didn't appreciate the ring's presence during business discussions.

It's one thing to admire the way Joe Namath throws a forward pass, but quite another thing to trust him with your portfolio. Which is why the athletes who have remained in the in- dustry have learned, as Bill Mathis puts it, "to underplay the sports angle," and why just about all the firms for whom pro athletes work have moved the ath- letes into the institutional end of the business.

There is a significant difference between being a so-called "custom- er's man" i. An insti- tutional salesman isn't really selling anything. His job is to feed company- inspired research ideas into fund man- agers, the understanding being that if a particular institution uses an idea — and there is no charge for this research "ser- vice" — and if the idea works out, the institution will show its gratitude by throwing some brokerage business to the firm which supplied the idea.

An- other thing institutional salesmen do is get chummy with institutional traders. Traders don't decide what to buy; they decide, except in cases where specific instructions come in with the order, which brokerage firm is going to exe- cute — and receive commission for — the order. As such, because these accounts deal in such huge volume, they are keys to an enormous percentage of broker- age commissions earned on any given day on Wall Street.

The discretionary power of institu- tional traders and this power varies considerably from institution to insti- tution is a very touchy subject on Wall Street — the problem being that the great majority of orders crossing a typical trader's desk can be executed with equal dispatch by any number of firms.

One hears a lot of talk about criteria and so forth, but the fact re- mains that the amount of business an institutional salesman brings into his his entire basketball career. The hell with research,' a partner in one firm said. For this reason, traders as a group are probably the most lavishly entertained men on Wall Street.

The jocks on Wall Street, for the most part, are selling "research and execution," which is to say they're out in the field, sometimes on their own or sometimes with a research spe- cialist, working on fund managers, in- stitutional research directors, traders, bank presidents — anybody in a position to allot brokerage business.

When Stroud's former firm. If your firm has a good research group and experienced traders, it's mainly a matter of getting the customers to like you and trust your judgment — to answer the phone when you call so that you can at least present an idea. Tucker Frederickson, for in- stance, took part in last summer's R. Bill Mathis, through David Merrick's influence, now has an investor's interest in Broadway.

Fred- erickson and Mathis together own Dun- can's formerly Chuck's Composite , a popular East Side pub and restaurant. Athletes, then, seem to have an edge. Anybody, after all, can take you to a football or basketball game, but how many people can take you to the locker room afterwards and introduce your twelve-year-old son to Ron Johnson or Walt Frazier?

Not all athletes operate in this vein. Jack Stroud, for instance, refuses to make post-game locker room visits Tucker Frederickson: Still, introducing clients to other athletes is a fairly common practice. What's wrong with an athlete's taking advantage of his status in the society? Is it any different from making use of school ties or family connec- tions?

It's only more conspicuous, and that's the problem. Wall Street has al- ways endeavored to convey the im- pression that its salesmen arc a breed apart from salesmen in other fields, and that being a stockbroker embodies a level of intelligence, expertise and moral rectitude simply not found in other sales-oriented industries. Thus, to admit that having a reputation in something as far removed from in- vestments as pro football might help a man rise quickly up the Wall Street ladder would imply that what a lot of Wall Streeters have been saying all along about the brokerage industry is true: The frequent complaint is that in- stitutional traders, especially the younger ones, show partiality to name athletes.

But what they can do is pro- vide information — tell you little things about who's looking to buy what and in what quantity. I call up a trader and offer him a deal and he might say 'no, thank you,' and that's it. If the guy is really into sports, and a ballplayer calls up, he's still going to say no, but he may continue chatting and drop a little tip his way. It's not legal, but how are you going to stop it?

In the meantime, the athlete has some in- formation, and he can get his own deal cooking. That's the whole secret of trading: I lost money for myself, for my father and for Frank Gilford. I do well in this end of the business because I have the confidence to go out and meet new people, and to get along with them.

That's one thing playing football gave me — con- fidence. The name value is secondary. It can get you in the front door a little faster than somebody else, but from then on, it's up to you. Braun began his career as a retail broker for Eastman Dillon, Union Securities in , and, while he was only modestly successful as a re- tail broker, now earns in a single year more than he earned in his entire career as an athlete, and mainly because he has managed to develop the trust and con- fidence of the head traders at several of the largest institutional accounts in the industry.

That's why I spent so much time going out with these men at night. Now we socialize routinely. We go to each other's houses. Our wives are friendly. Are we friends be- cause I'm an ex-ballplayer? I don't really think so. But I do know one thing. Friendship or not, this is a per- formance business.

Just like basket- ball. The mob's decision to re-enter the narcotics business after a ten-year ban is expected to escalate further what is already open warfare among New York City's independent junk dealers. After a series of secret meetings in August, the city's Mafia leaders decided to end their ten-year self-imposed pro- hibition and re-enter the narcotics busi- ness.

It was a decision based on the fact that the profits in drugs today are greater and the risks more remote than ever. Long before the public was aware that the police department property clerk's office served as a major drug supply center, Mafiosi knew that law enforcement in the area had broken down. It was the Mafiosi, after all, who were buying back much of the same heroin and cocaine that was being seized from them by narcotics agents.

The decision, aside from its probable social consequences, is expected to es- calate further what is already open warfare among the independent junk dealers who now control the importa- tion and distribution of drugs in the city. In the last two years, for instance, there have been more than mur- ders of middle-level non-addict pushers.

There has been, in fact, even without the Mafia's heavy hand, an exotic orgy of violence among the city's free-wheeling dealers, wholesalers, smugglers, import- ers, corrupt cops, double agents and street-comer pushers. There are parts of Bedford-Stuyvesant in which black heroin dealers control so many killers that even state legislators and local po- litical leaders admit privately that they are terrified to speak out against specific individuals.

There are streets in Harlem, the South Bronx, and around the Sunset Park area of predominantly white working-class South Brooklyn where pushers openly argue over choice side- walk locations, like chestnut vendors outside Radio City. In upper Manhat- tan's Washington Heights area where Cuban dealers have established them- selves in some of the bars along Broad- way, from th Street north, daily shootouts have paralyzed police action with sheer volume.

In the Bronx, whole- sale junk markets on Walton Avenue off the Grand Concourse continue to proliferate even though police records show repeated arrests and harassment. The drug world seems to gain strength from adversity. It is an envi- ronment of thoughtless, mechanical, clockwork violence. Since many of the deaths occur in black, Puerto Rican and Cuban neighborhoods, however, the media and the public have missed most of the fireworks.

Occasionally, a murder involving middle-class whites, an undercover cop or a Mafia soldier makes the papers and the Six O'Clock News. On the same day, a typical day, the following drug- related homicides and assaults also took place in the city, but without any men- tion in the press the list does not in- clude addict street crimes such as mug- gings and holdups: John Spann, 35, shot and killed at II 1th Street and Fifth Avenue by an unknown man hiding in a doorway; Ronald Lucas, 24, stabbed to death in front of East 21st Street, Brooklyn; Luis Rivas, 28, shot and killed while standing in front of 54 Jesup Place, the Bronx; Bartolo Courasco, shot and critically wounded by two men from a passing car while standing on Colum- bus Avenue, near West 82nd Street; Clark Jackson, shot and seriously in- jured at Eighth Avenue and th Street; Robert Smith, shot and serious- ly injured while standing in front of 19 West th Street; Hector Santiago and Guillermo Rodriques, shot and critical- ly injured by two men in a passing car at the corner of Graham and Seigel Streets, Brooklyn; Israel Ortiz and James Delgado, shot and critically in- jured while standing in front of Morris Avenue, the Bronx; Eliot Ro- man, shot while standing on the corner of Vyse Avenue afid East th Street, the Bronx.

The real danger for the city's drug dealers, quite obviously, does not come from the law. As the center of the na- tion's drug traffickers. New York has become Junk City, a predatory scene of unrivaled violence, official corrup- tion and Byzantine plots.

No army of anthropologists could ever have con- structed a laboratory habitat better suited to the enrichment of the Mafia's style. The very chaos of the city's drug business has made it a temptation to the mob. When the Mafia abandoned the nar- cotics business in the early s it was because too many bosses suddenly found themselves going to jail for drug conspiracies hatched by their under- lings.

A few Mafiosi had continued dealing in narcotics, even during the boss-im- posed ban, and today increasing num- bers of the mob's aggressive and avari- cious young Turks refuse to accept the timidity of rich godfathers as enough reason to stay out of narcotics. The profits are simply too great. Compared with other illicit Mafia businesses, importing and distributing drugs is administratively painless.

In the last two years, there have been more than murders of middle-level, non-addict heroin and cocaine pushers. Someone has to talce those bets, count the money, deal with the telephone installers, to say noth- ing of paying off the winners, cops, land- lords, bidl bondsmen and disgruntled Mafia employees. In addition, there are now very few hoods around who do not know how easy it can be to smuggle ctmtraband into the United States.

Niagara Falls, Lake Champlain, the St. Lawrence Seaway, scores of small waterways, unguarded bor- der roads and 1,0 30 rural airstrips upon which a small plane can land unde- tected. This entire stretch is patrolled by border guards, with never more than twenty of them on duty at one time. Just as the Mafiosi had replaced the Jewish racketeers who controlled the narcotics business before the end of World War II "smack" as slang for heroin is derived from the Yiddish word schmeck, or smell , a loose amal- gam of multi-racial and multi-ethnic en- trepreneurs took the Italians' place in the early sixties.

Blacks, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Argentinians, Brazilians and, lately, Chinese distributors moved in on the wholesale and importation level. Independent black junk deal- ers like Julian St. Harrison, at 53, is known to police as a ten-kilo man who specializes in supplying out- of-towners from his East th Street headquarters in the Bronx.

Hartley and Barnes are both considered major traf- fickers, Barnes having been a hoot for the East Harlem Mafiosi before they got out. Stepney, who police say com- mutes from Teaneck, New Jersey, to Bedford-Stuyvesant every day, is an- other of the city's top dealers. The money being made by black racketeers in narcotics, of course, is finding its way into other illegitimate enterprises.

Blacks are not only run- ning their own policy and loanshark operations in areas that were once Ma- te controlled, but they have bqpm moving into legitimate businesses as well. Bar-and-giilla, drycleaiung shops, liquor stores, even glwtto tenements are being swallowed up by black rack- eteers in payment for gambling and loanshark debts, a pattern of upward criminal mobility ominously familiar to the Mafiosi themselves.

One of the biggest Cuban operators in the city today is Rene Texeira, who lives in the Bronx but controls, along with Regilio Fernandez, another Cu- ban, most of the trafficking in northern Manhattan and New Jersey. The Ma- fia's greatest problem in retaking their netherworld interests will tmdoubtedly come from the Cuban radceteers.

The Cubans' greatest enemies at pres- ent, however, are the city's Puerto Rican racketeers, who are in direct competi- tion for the Latin junk market and for gambling and loan-shark operations. Lionel Gonzalez, anoth- er of the city's powerful Puerto Rican dealers, concentrates his activities in the South Bronx, more specifically from his headquarters along Southern Boule- vard between th and th Streets.

He is, in fact, the island's key supplier. These top dealers are so care- fully insulated from their day-to-day operations that it is extremely difficult, despite almost daily harassment and questioning by the police, to land any of these men in court. Further complicating the Mafia's takeover plans are the Chinese.

During the middle sixties, however, in- creasing numbers of Chinese seamen began jumping ship in the United States with as much as ten kilos of heroin strapped to their backs. Sud- denly, the poppy farms of Turkey, the smuggling routes through Sicily and Corsica, and the refineries in Marseilles were no longer the only sources. To- day, it is estimated that more than half the heroin used in the United States comes from the Far East, much of it smuggled into the country by ship- juminng Chinese seamen.

Customs and immigration ofiicials say it is impossible to deal with the problem effectively. On April 11, seven Chinese were arrested in New York with eleven pounds of heroin, and six of the seven turned out to be ship- jumpers. The heroin was part of a pound batch brought into the country by a European diplomat.

The Mafiosi explored a return to the drug trade about a year ago. Key men were given permission to make buys, and a few have been caught. On January 18, Louis Cirillo, a Luc- chese family associate, was indicted in Miami in a 1,pound multi-million- dollar heroin-smuggling conspiracy. On April 29, while searching through Ciril- lo s Bronx home.

Gargiulo's in Coney Island — an artist's version. Papa had onee served five years for selling narcotics and had a record of 26 arrests. On May 10, [oseph o o Manfredi. Michael Papa, Vincent Papa's year- old nephew, was arrested with another man for selling eleven pounds of co- caine to an undercover agent.

In addition to the unusual rash of Mafia-associated drug arrests, police began hearing rumors that a number of gangland killings were directly re- lated to the mob's re-entry into drugs. On August 10, for instance, the bodies of two of Joseph Manfredi 's nephews, one of whom had been arrested with him on May 10, were found in the deserted Clason's Point section of the Bronx.

The killing was apparently in- tended to insure silence in the drug case involving their uncle. He had just walked out of his girl friend Elvira Dolly Lenzo's LefFerts Avenue apartment, shortly after midnight, when two men stepped out of a yellow panel truck and opened fire, hitting Eboli five times in the head and neck. Federal agents suspect that Eboli was killed not because of a Mafia family feud, but because he was in- volved in a S4-million narcotics scheme in which he tried to withhold more than a million dollars.

It is now suspected that Eboli had withheld that sum from his peers, the very top-level Mafia financiers who had originally bankrolled Cirillo's heroin-smuggling plan. As is customary in such cases, underlings like Cirillo are not held responsible for the greed of their bosses and are, therefore, spared.

Eboli, however, knew better. He had made fools of his own kind. The only thing that took them so long [Eboli was killed two months and seventeen days after the money was uncovered] was that they were probably trying to get him to replace the million so he could live.

Federal narcotics agents, who have Illustrated by Harvey Dinnerstein NEW YORK 35 The Untoachables The city's top drug dealers — carefully insulated from day- to-day operations, and, de- spite the volume of their traf- ficking in heroin and cocaine, difiicult to catch and even harder to get into court. Vincent Papa — Lucchcso associate, ar- rested in February with , des- tined for a pound heroin purchase.

Another indication was the appearance in New York late last year of Thomas Buscetta, a Sicilian- born man of many passports and the Mafia's main South American connec- tion. He was wanted at the time by Sicilian police for masterminding a massacre in which seven police- men and three civilians died. Cavalaro, and owns a fleet of taxicabs and a string of luncheonettes.

Harrison — independent dealer catering to Newark, Buffalo and Wash- ington, D. While customs officials marveled at the fact that each of the passports bore a different name under his photo- graph, and as they searched his car, finding a Playboy Club credit slip, a booklet of lottery tickets and a reel of obscene film, Buscetta disappeared from the border patrol station.

Bucetta's importance to the Mafiosi is twofold. He is not only their man in South America, but he also represents, at 44 years of age, just the kind of po- tential Mafia boss that old-world dons like Carlo Gambino would like to see take over the secret society. Gambino has been importing foreign-born Mafiosi like Buscetta for several years, and po- lice intelligence officers suspect that much of the pressure being applied to organized crime leaders to return to narcotics has been exerted by these old-world imports.

They are in upstate New York. Gambino and Marcello and Magaddino are bringing Sicilians over. Right here, in downtown New York, the numbers are all theirs. Joe Mush had a gigantic policy operation, but the greasers told him 'bow or you're dead. They've got the old man's okay, and when they move it's going to be a bloody mess. Despite the fact that it was held in public on a busy Friday night, it was not until months later that the New York City police Cc: Leroy Barnes — Harlem trafficker, was a Mafla middleman before the mob got out of drugs.

Lionel Gonzalez — one of the biggest dealers; operates out of Southern Boule- vard headquarters in the South Bronx. Inexplicably, the NYPD, to the mob's delight, has decided to cut back the kind of surveillance work needed to fight or- ganized crime. The FBI had apparent- ly missed the meeting as well, and, if it had not been for an IRS agent in search of an acquaintance of one of those who attended the meeting, no law enforce- ment unit would have known of the meeting.

Those attending included Car- mine Tramunti, acting head of the Lucchese family, long known for its drug operations. Based in East Harlem, it had a virtual monopoly in supplying drugs to black and Puerto Rican ghet- tos before the Mafia-imposed ban. While Tramunti has no personal in- volvement with narcotics his interests are almost exclusively gambling , as the family's titular head his approval was not only expected but required.

Philip Rastelli, acting boss of the Bo- nanno family, was also present. The Bonannos have been well known as a Robert Stepney — one of the city's top independent dealers, most active in Brooklyn's Bed-Stuy area. The Bonanno Mafia family has always been evenly divided between Montreal and New York, and it has specialized in smuggling of all kinds. Rastelli, who has taken over the Bo- nanno mob and moved into a racket vacuum in New Jersey, is expected to be the first Mafia boss to make a move in solidifying the drug business.

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