Not The Wizard Of Oz I Diari Di Casanova

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Similarly, the Wizard made the people in the Emerald City wear green goggles so that they would believe that their city was built from emeralds. Follow the yellow brick road to It is honestly as bad as Texas Chainsaw Massacre: Denslow, of one of the most popular books in American children's literature, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz , better known today as simply The Wizard of Oz. And, how my cousin Roxy fell asleep before the intrepid gang made it into the witch's castle. The film adaptation has become a classic of popular culture, shown annually on American television from to and then several times a year every year beginning in

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Edit Cast Cast overview: Good Witch Brandy Aniston Auntie Em Alexis Adams Sheila The Scarecrow Stella Marie Tin Man James Bartholet Wicked Witch Guard Seth Gamble I found the original book charming, but had some challenges with suspending my "oh-come-on-now" sensibilities.

However, if I were to have read the book for the first time, out loud to children, I know I would have been drawn into the magic of it. See all 18 questions about The Wizard of Oz…. Lists with This Book. I don't think I'll read the rest of the series but I did really enjoy this. View all 7 comments. Rick Polito, Marin Independent Journal, View all 54 comments.

When Oz disappeared from the story, it was funny to see the confused face of my daughter saying: Frank Baum 's attempt to mislead the readers. Young people heartly fantasize. Con l'uscita di scena del mago di Oz, vedere la faccia spiazzata di mia figlia che dice: Frank Baum di spiazzare i lettori. View all 12 comments.

Once upon a time there lived a Golden Age gay icon, who whiled away her pre-waxing years sitting atop a split-rail fence in some dour, nondescript American Midwest landscape. Or a Sally Beauty Supply. This girl, as yet scarcely old enough to have a couple of cherries or a leaping dolphin tattooed near her cameltoe, was named Dorothy. One day, like so many dreamy-eyed girls, she donned her Skechers and her discount department store jeans and waited for a meteorological disaster to rescue her from her sad, glitterless rural life.

At first, Dorothy mistook the rhythmic vibrations for a circuit party and looked under the bed for her whistle, but soon enough she realized she was airborne. And it felt Fab. She thought she even spotted a cross-country Virgin America flight with Diana Ross sitting in first class refusing a skunky glass of Chardonnay and calling the stewardess an uppity white bitch.

But maybe Dorothy was unconscious and imagining it all. At any rate, she was immune to the ghastly, soul-rending shrieks, rising from below, of a Kansas mother cradling her dead baby who was impaled by a windswept awl in the cyclone. Outside her trailer a bunch of ghetto midgets were milling around with some old witchy broad.

Basically, this bitch is no help at all. Okay, you know the rest of the story for the most part.

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Dorothy seeks out the Wizard of Oz by mapquesting Emerald City or, alternately, the City of Emeralds and on the way she meets a Scarecrow, a Tin Woodman, and a Lion, who are all needy and want to bask in the glow of her super-hot blinding aura and fierce fantabulousness and bum a few amphetamines.

Whilst filing his nails and reading the latest issue of Interview with Drew Barrymore on the cover, the Wizard tells his motley supplicants that, yeah, yeah, sure, he will grant their stupid, retarded wishes if they murder the Wicked Witch of the West, a Tribeca scenester who is always bogarting Page Six with her leather-daddy winged monkey warehouse parties.

Eventually, during a wet t-shirt contest, the witch melts and Dorothy, still flush with her first taste of killing… sweet killing, returns with her entourage to the Wizard to claim her payoff. But then, gosh golly, gee whiz… in a startling atheistic allegory, the all-powerful Wizard is revealed to be an impotent little Wallace Shawn-type standing behind a screen fiddling with some sound board knobs.

Dorothy, burnt-out on the Emerald City scene and suffering from dehydration and exhaustion, longs to return to Kansas to start her autobiographical blog. Dorothy skips and frolics through the gory pools of matted fur, blood, and steaming viscera and asks Glinda, who appears to be on Quaaludes, for a trip home.

And, by the way, when she returns to the Sticks, she should really take off those Chinese panda-skin leatherette things. Dorothy overdoses one night in a dilapidated feed barn on a potent mixture of Robitussin and Gas-X, and Judy Davis plays her in a television movie that no one remembers long enough to have forgotten. View all 35 comments.

May 24, Hannah Greendale rated it really liked it Shelves: Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. Dorothy Gale and her little dog Toto are swept away by a tornado from Kansas all the way to the Land of Oz. With a little help from the Witch of the North, Dorothy and Toto set off down a road paved with yellow bricks in search of the City of Emeralds and the Wizard of Oz, a man said to have the power to help Dorothy find her way back to Kansas.

The cyclone had set the house down, very gently - for a cyclone Click here to watch a video review of this book on my channel, From Beginning to Bookend. The cyclone had set the house down, very gently - for a cyclone - in the midst of a country of marvelous beauty. There were lovely patches of green sward all about, with stately trees bearing rich and luscious fruits.

Banks of gorgeous flowers were on every hand, and birds with rare and brilliant plumage sang and fluttered in the trees and bushes. Along the way, Dorothy makes some unusual new friends, each of which desire something from the Wizard of Oz. He intended to write a children's book with new fantasy creatures in a realm yet unexplored, and his efforts were a marvelous success.

Dorothy's journey through the colorful and peculiar Land of Oz reveals an array of creatures like winged monkeys, talking china dolls, and bearlike Kalidahs. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is not the technicolor film known by millions, but rather, a surprisingly grim tale that is absent of ruby slippers and cities with emerald-green structures.

As it came nearer the Tin Woodman saw that running before the beast was a little gray field-mouse, and although he had no heart he knew it was wrong for the wildcat to try to kill such a pretty, harmless creature. So the Woodman raised his axe, and as the wildcat ran by he gave it a quick blow that cut the beast's head clean off from its body, and it rolled over at his feet in two pieces.

With quirky illustrations, an amusing sense of logic, and delightful characters, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is a gratifying start to a well-loved series. View all 18 comments. A Short Introduction This might be common knowledge or it might not be. Some economics textbooks claim this is a wonderfully esoteric nugget: The story of Oz was an economic parable.

Take that, all you who said economics can't be fun. Redistributions of wealth caused by unexpected changes in the price level are often a source of political turmoil. From to the price level in the United States fell 23 percent. This deflation was good for Haves creditors - primarily the bankers of the Northeast , but it was bad for Have-Nots debtors - primarily the farmers of the South and West.

The deflation was blamed almost exclusively on the now notorious Gold Standard and a proposed move towards Silver was instead the craved for alternative. The Silver issue dominated the presidential election of William McKinley, the Republican nominee, campaigned on a platform of preserving the gold standard. Then came The Wizard of Oz.

The midwestern journalist, L. Frank Baum tells the story of Dorothy, a girl lost in a strange land far from her home in Kansas. Dorothy representing traditional American values makes three friends: Together, the four of them make their way along a perilous yellow brick road the gold standard , hoping to find the Wizard who will help Dorothy return home.

Eventually they arrive in Oz Washington , where everyone sees the world through green glasses money. The Wizard William McKinley tries to be all things to all people but turns out to be a fraud. Unfortunately the movie forgot the parable and omitted the silver slippers - thus depriving the majority of the audience of the real delight in the victory!

The Republicans The Wizard won the election of , and the United States stayed on a gold standard, but the Free Silver advocates got the inflation that they wanted after gold was discovered in Alaska, Australia, and South Africa. Even later, Gold was abandoned altogether and the fraudster wizards was never heard from again.

Dorothy and Baum had the last laugh over the unwanted magical oppression of the Yellow Brick Road and the green-tinted world. Well, at least from the road. View all 25 comments. I honestly had pretty low expectations going into this book and thought it wouldn't compare at all to the greatness of the movie which is one of my favorite movies , but I was wrong.

It was one of the best children's classics that I've ever read and I even loved how it wasn't that similar to the movie, so it kept me interested. I also had a beautiful hardcover Puffin Classics edition, so that make the experience even better!

All in all, I'm so glad that I had to read it for my class! View all 3 comments. The film version of The Wizard of Oz is such an important part of American history that I most likely had it memorized by the time I was eight years old. Between the music, images changing from black and white to color, and the defeat of a wicked witch, the movie was simply magical.

Being a tomboy, however, my reading interests as a child were never inclined toward classic books such as Little Women and, of course, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz. Having my interest piqued by the yearly To Oz? Having my interest piqued by the yearly viewing of this movie at Thanksgiving, I decided to finally read this children's classic book for myself.

Lyman Frank Baum had been struggling in business and needed to be able to support his family of five children. Life in the circus had failed, so he turned to writing. Morally supported by his wife Maud, Baum turned to writing enduring children's classics like the ones he grew up reading. Setting out to write a classic piece of children's literature, Baum started the saga of Dorothy of Kansas that later became the Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

When Baum died unexpectedly of a heart attack in , he had penned one Oz story a year since His family had moved to the sleepy village of Hollywood, and the Baum family lived off of royalties generated from the Oz books and subsequent attempts at stage versions.

The first story entitled the Wonderful Wizard of Oz was the most successful and lead to Baum leading the writing life that he strived to attain as a child. Although Baum did not live to see the movie version of his book, he would be pleased to know that children and adults are still reading his stories over one hundred years later.

The story of Dorothy that has been preserved on film is actually only the first half of the book. In this half Dorothy and Toto ride in their house is carried in a cyclone from Kansas to Oz. Upon landing, they are heralded by the munchkins who laud them for killing the Wicked Witch of the East.

There is no music here, only advice to follow the yellow brick road to the Emerald City and seek advice from the great and terrible wizard of Oz. The four all desire that Oz help them attain what they want most and assist Dorothy on her journey. Until they reach the magical city, there is no witch or conflict to speak of, only creatures of assorted shapes and sizes who are happy to help Dorothy find her way home.

The wicked witch of the West does make a brief appearance when Oz tasks Dorothy with killing her. The melting scene is short and without much drama. Perhaps a child would be scared by the witch and her winged monkeys as I know I was as a child. As an adult who is reading the book for posterity, the witch's appearance was anti climatic because I know how the story inevitably ends.

For a girl, however; Dorothy exhibits much bravery on her journey in facing the powerful witch alone and all these years later is still a magical heroine for young girls. Perhaps one reason why this story has endured is because of the lack of conflict which translates well to a feel good musical on the big screen. As a result, Baum's story has become a classic for the ages.

I read a version illustrated by Australian artist Robert Ingpen. His lovely drawings facilitated my reading about Dorothy and friends as they journey toward Oz. Being as familiar with the story as I am, I almost enjoyed the illustrations more than the story because I desired to see the munchkins, the yellow brick road, and the Emerald City.

With the story being geared toward children and almost dragging at times, I appreciated the color illustrations which reminded me where I was on Dorothy's journey and kept me focused on the story. Even as I knew the denouement, I loved how the illustrations brought the story to its epic conclusion, especially in the parts not included on film which I had to imagine for myself.

These pictures only helped to make Oz an epic reading experience. Critics note that the Oz saga of books mirrors populism and William Jennings Bryan and has been banned in many places. I did not have my history thinking cap on while reading so I was unable to link Baum's life in Kansas to Bryan and populism in the and presidential elections.

What I did discover was the written form of a magical movie that I have seen many times over. It was an enchanting reading experience that is probably loved by children more so than adults, yet one that has lasted as a slice of American history for more than one hundred years.

View all 9 comments. Dorothy, from Kansas, wherever that is lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, on the flat American prairie, the harsh Sun beating down from the gray sky, making everything turn gray No trees, brooks, beautiful birds singing or anything colorful around the poor farm. But our adventures begin when a tornado lifts unlucky Dorothy , her dog Dorothy, from Kansas, wherever that is lives with her Aunt Em and Uncle Henry, on the flat American prairie, the harsh Sun beating down from the gray sky, making everything turn gray But our adventures begin when a tornado lifts unlucky Dorothy , her dog Toto, and only friend, while inside their small one room house, up into the swirling, whistling, ominous black sky, scared Aunt Em in the cellar a dark hole in the ground under the floor , hiding and Uncle Henry outside taking care of the frightened farm animals.

The little girl is all alone with her dog, as the strong winds of the storm takes her higher and higher, always going above and further from Dorothy's loved ones, which is the blood relative, is strangely never stated. After countless hours pass, she falls asleep on her bed. Awakening by a loud noise the house crashing down on the ground the next day , terrifying Dorothy But weird , quite small people are timidly coming towards Dorothy, they think she is a horrible , powerful witch the juvenile feels uneasy, looking fully grown , like the Munchkins, yet still a little girl's size And thanking the girl for their freedom , by killing the wicked Witch of the East, whose body lies underneath the house.

The pretty Witch of the North, and is good also, unheard of, news spreads quickly in the Land of Oz gives Dorothy the magical silver shoes of the dead sorceress. The farm girl wants to get back home to Kansas, asks directions, nobody knows it, but all tell Dorothy to follow the yellow brick road, to the Emerald City where the Great and Powerful Wizard of Oz, presumably lives and rules.

Trouble is, people never see the terrible wizard, but he is the only one who can help Dorothy get back. On the long journey, the young girl and Toto, meets the brainless failure, the Scarecrow, stuck on a pole, the Tin Woodman, rusting outside in a forest tin doesn't rust , the Cowardly Lion, attacking the group on the road and afterwards crying, all join Dorothy on her impossible quest, for a brain, a heart and courage the joke of this story is, that every traveler already has them, even Dorothy's wish, can be easily achieved.

Wide ditches have to be jumped, wild animals fought, rivers crossed, ugly flying monkeys, bees, poisonous blue, red, yellow, white and purple, flowers, thick, gloomy forests, strange people some unfriendly, and not made of flesh the evil, dreadful, Witch of the West, in her impenetrable, dismal castle, but that is later , must be overcome, to reach the fabulous Emerald City.

They have a secret weapon, Toto is not afraid of anything View all 23 comments. This is one of the most bizarre books I've ever read. The fantasy elements are all rather ordinary. S Lewis would soon follow suit and inspire later generations. But the point is the Land of Oz is just weird.

Seems like a bland criticism, though the entire point of the plot is to have good triumph over evil. But what is evil? Is she really that bad? It seems unusual to create such an evilly induced character and then have her preform no evil; it sort of makes the whole moral of the story seem questionable.

Simply put, an apt summary of the story would be: Are they evil heroes? Dorothy is completely unheroic. All her success is down to unbelievable blind luck; it gets to the point that she performs a completely random action, like throwing water at someone, and she somehow saves the day.

The Tin Woodsman is an even stranger figure. For me this was slightly hypocritical. It made little sense. I think for a child who just sees the basic plot of this, they would easily become lost. I could go on to explain how the structure is a slight mess. But as an actual novel, the progression of chapters really is quite poor. I picked out two points where the novel really should have ended; yet, it kept going on when the climax had finished and all momentum has been lost.

For me this book is an example of an overly hyped cultural phenomenon. Everyone my age I have ever met has watched the film at some point in their life; the basic narrative is embodied into their cultural psyche, which happens with many literary classics of this type. The point is the book here is a very different thing.

I implore everyone who bases their knowledge, and perhaps love, of this on the movie to actually sit down and read the horrendous work in question; then you may see what it actually is: This one was quite a shocker! View all 19 comments. This is a book I read as a child, even before I saw the musical, and enjoyed a lot.

However, my memory of it was overshadowed by the film. So it was a good experience to read it again as an adult. The book is worth reading, not least because it differs in some major ways from the film adaptation. The biggest difference is that the whole dream sequence scenario, in which people from Kansas are transmogrified into figures of fantasy, is entirely absent.

Dorothy wears Silver Shoes, not Ruby Slippers. And so on and so forth. Baum says in the preface that he has tried to offer a modernized fairy tale: Modern education includes morality; therefore the modern child seeks only entertainment in its wonder tales and gladly dispenses with all disagreeable incident.

Frank Lyman Frank The Wonderful Wizard of Oz p. The Woodman tells a horrific back-story not included in the film, in which he undergoes unheard-of torture at the hands of the Wicked Witch of the East. The Lion faces some gruesome opponents, one of which is rather Tolkienesque in its monstrosity. Dorothy takes Toto in her arms, knocks her heels together three times, and wishes to return home.

Instantly, she begins whirling through the air and rolling through the grass of the Kansas prairie, up to her Kansas farmhouse. Dorothy runs to her Aunt Em, saying "I'm so glad to be at home again! The book was illustrated by Baum's friend and collaborator W.

Denslow , who also co-held the copyright. The design was lavish for the time, with illustrations on many pages, backgrounds in different colors, and several color plate illustrations. The editorial opined that had it not been for Denslow's pictures, the readers would be unable to picture precisely the figures of Dorothy, Toto, and the other characters.

The distinctive look led to imitators at the time, most notably Eva Katherine Gibson's Zauberlinda, the Wise Witch , which mimicked both the typography and the illustration design of Oz. Denslow's illustrations were so well known that merchants of many products obtained permission to use them to promote their wares. Costume jewelry, mechanical toys, and soap were also designed using their figures.

A new edition of the book appeared in , with illustrations by Evelyn Copelman. Baum acknowledged the influence of the Brothers Grimm and Hans Christian Andersen , which he was deliberately revising in his "American fairy tales" to include the wonder without the horrors. Local legend has it that Oz, also known as The Emerald City, was inspired by a prominent castle-like building in the community of Castle Park near Holland, Michigan , where Baum lived during the summer.

The yellow brick road was derived from a road at that time paved by yellow bricks. Baum was a frequent guest at the hotel and had written several of the Oz books there. Some critics have suggested that Baum may have been inspired by Australia , a relatively new country at the time of the book's original publication. Australia is often colloquially spelled or referred to as "Oz".

Furthermore, in Ozma of Oz , Dorothy gets back to Oz as the result of a storm at sea while she and Uncle Henry are traveling by ship to Australia. Like Australia, Oz is an island continent somewhere to the west of California with inhabited regions bordering on a great desert. One might imagine that Baum intended Oz to be Australia, or perhaps a magical land in the center of the great Australian desert.

Carroll rejected the Victorian-era ideology that children's books should be saturated with morals , instead believing that children should be allowed to be children. Building on Carroll's style of numerous images accompanying the text, Baum combined the conventional features of a fairy tale witches and wizards with the well-known things in his readers' lives scarecrows and cornfields.

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz is considered the first American fairy tale because of its references to clear American locations such as Kansas and Omaha. Baum agreed with authors such as Carroll that fantasy literature was important for children, along with numerous illustrations, but he also wanted to create a story that had recognizable American elements in it, such as farming and industrialization.

Many of the characters, props, and ideas in the novel were drawn from Baum's experiences. As a child, Baum frequently had nightmares of a scarecrow pursuing him across a field. Moments before the scarecrow's "ragged hay fingers" nearly gripped his neck, it would fall apart before his eyes.

Decades later, as an adult, Baum integrated his tormentor into the novel as the Scarecrow. He wished to make something captivating for the window displays, so he used an eclectic assortment of scraps to craft a striking figure. From a washboiler he made a body, from bolted stovepipes he made arms and legs, and from the bottom of a saucepan he made a face. Baum then placed a funnel hat on the figure, which ultimately became the Tin Woodman.

Rockefeller was the nemesis of Baum's father, an oil baron who declined to purchase Standard Oil shares in exchange for selling his own oil refinery. Baum scholar Evan I. Schwartz posited that Rockefeller inspired one of the Wizard's numerous faces. In one scene in the novel, the Wizard is seen as a "tyrannical, hairless head". When Rockefeller was 54 years old, the medical condition alopecia caused him to lose every strand of hair on his head, making people fearful of speaking to him.

In the early s, Baum's play Matches was being performed when a "flicker from a kerosene lantern sparked the rafters", causing the Baum opera house to be consumed by flames. Schwartz suggested that this might have inspired the Scarecrow's severest terror: In , Baum lived in Aberdeen, which was experiencing a drought, and he wrote a witty story in his "Our Landlady" column in Aberdeen's The Saturday Pioneer [24] about a farmer who gave green goggles to his horses, causing them to believe that the wood chips that they were eating were pieces of grass.

Similarly, the Wizard made the people in the Emerald City wear green goggles so that they would believe that their city was built from emeralds. During Baum's short stay in Aberdeen, the dissemination of myths about the plentiful West continued. However, the West, instead of being a wonderland, turned into a wasteland because of a drought and a depression. In , Baum moved his family from South Dakota to Chicago.

At that time, Chicago was getting ready for the World's Columbian Exposition in After discovering that the myths about the West's incalculable riches were baseless, Baum created "an extension of the American frontier in Oz". In many respects, Baum's creation is similar to the actual frontier save for the fact that the West was still undeveloped at the time.

The Munchkins Dorothy encounters at the beginning of the novel represent farmers, as do the Winkies she later meets. Baum's wife frequently visited her niece, Dorothy Louise Gage. The infant became gravely sick and died on November 11, , from "congestion of the brain" at exactly five months.

When the baby, whom Maud adored as the daughter she never had, died, she was devastated and needed to consume medicine. Bossed around by his wife Matilda , Henry rarely dissented with her. He flourished in business, though, and his neighbors looked up to him. Likewise, Uncle Henry was a "passive but hard-working man" who "looked stern and solemn, and rarely spoke".

The stories of barbarous acts against accused witches scared Baum. Two key events in the novel involve wicked witches who both meet their death through metaphorical means. Baum held different jobs, moved a lot, and was exposed to many people, so the inspiration for the story could have been taken from many different aspects of his life.

Baum, a former salesman of china, wrote in chapter 20 about china that had sprung to life. The original illustrator of the novel, W. Denslow, could also have influenced the story and the way it has been interpreted. Baum and Denslow had a close working relationship and worked together to create the presentation of the story through the images and the text.

Color is an important element of the story and is present throughout the images, with each chapter having a different color representation. Denslow also added characteristics to his drawings that Baum never described. For example, Denslow drew a house and the gates of the Emerald City with faces on them. In the later Oz books, John R. Neill , who illustrated all of the sequels, continued to include these faces on gates.

Baum did not offer any conclusive proof that he intended his novel to be a political allegory. Dighe wrote that for 60 years after the book's publication, "virtually nobody" had such an interpretation until Henry Littlefield , a high-school teacher. Parable on Populism", [35] Littlefield posited that the book contained an allegory of the late 19th-century bimetallism debate regarding monetary policy.

Littlefield's thesis achieved some support, but has been strenuously attacked by others. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz has become an established part of multiple cultures, spreading from its early young American readership to becoming known throughout the world. It has been translated or adapted into well over fifty languages, at times being modified in local variations.

For instance, in some abridged Indian editions, the Tin Woodman was replaced with a horse. The film adaptation has become a classic of popular culture, shown annually on American television from to and then several times a year every year beginning in The New York Times , September 8, [44]. The Wonderful Wizard of Oz received positive critical reviews upon release. In a September review, The New York Times praised the novel, writing that it would appeal to child readers and to younger children who could not read yet.

The review also praised the illustrations for being a pleasant complement to the text. During the first 50 years after The Wonderful Wizard of Oz ' s publication in , it received little critical analysis from scholars of children's literature. According to Ruth Berman of Science Fiction Studies , the lists of suggested reading published for juvenile readers never contained Baum's work.

The lack of interest stemmed from the scholars' misgivings about fantasy, as well as to their belief that lengthy series had little literary merit. It has frequently come under fire over the years. In , the director of Detroit's libraries banned The Wonderful Wizard of Oz for having "no value" for children of his day, for supporting "negativism", and for bringing children's minds to a "cowardly level".

Nye of Michigan State University countered that "if the message of the Oz books—love, kindness, and unselfishness make the world a better place—seems of no value today", then maybe the time is ripe for "reassess[ing] a good many other things besides the Detroit library's approved list of children's books". In , seven Fundamentalist Christian families in Tennessee opposed the novel's inclusion in the public school syllabus and filed a lawsuit.

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You can thank me later. Baum scholar Evan I. Archived from the original on June 10,

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Take it from me, there's a big difference between us. Dorothy's journey through the colorful and peculiar Land of Oz reveals an array of creatures like winged monkeys, talking china dolls, and bearlike Kalidahs.


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