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Mount Edgecombe is still there, beautiful as ever: As I looked upon him, he applied it to his lips, and began to play upon it. Een beschrijvende url wordt beter herkend door zoekmachines. This is strategy. Laci Kay Somers has uploaded a Boob vlog on her YouTube Channel, where she provides the tips about plastic surgery for breast augmentations and shares her experience of plastic surgery. Upgrade om de Google Ranking voor veelgebruikte zoekwoorden van co.

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Select an unsuspecting random victim in public and cold-cock him. Robbery is optional. Delfino Mora, a father of 12, was collecting cans in an alley on the Far North Side when he was struck and fell hard on concrete. Prosecutors said the teens spotted Mora about 5 a. Ayala handed the phone to Anthony Malcolm, 18, prosecutors said. As the three surrounded Mora, Jones asked him if he had any money in his pockets, Clancy said.

When Mora did not respond, Jones punched him in the jaw, she said. Mora fell, hitting the back of his head on the concrete with a loud crack that could be heard on the video, according to Clancy. About three hours passed before a passer-by found Mora unconscious but breathing. He died the next day of blunt trauma, according to the medical examiner. Jones was arrested Saturday carrying the same cellphone with the video still on it, Clancy said.

All three defendants were ordered held without bond. Louis, Decatur, and Madison, Wis. Last summer, Madison police said they were investigating more than 30 muggings by youths. In Chicago, several attacks have gained notoriety after videos surfaced online. Last fall, teenager Scotty Strahan was charged with aggravated battery after someone posted a YouTube video of him punching a homeless man at a CTA train stop while his friends howled with laughter.

Strahan pleaded guilty this year and was sentenced to probation. In January, the video of a beating of a year-old boy in Bridgeport went viral and sparked outrage after it was posted on YouTube. Eight teens are awaiting trial in that case. The Pilgrim's PiKxaiEss.

Then said Pliable, Don't revile ; if what the good Cyhristian says is true, the things he looks after are better than ours: Be ruled by me and go back, who knows whither such a brain-sick fellow will lead you? Go back, go back, and be wise. Nay, but do thou come with thy neighbor, Pliable ; there are such things to be had which I spoke of, and many more glories besides.

If you believe not me, read here in this book ; and for the truth of what is expressed therein, behold, all is confirmed by the blood of Him that made it. Well, neighbor Obstinate, said Pliable, I begin to come to a point: I intend to go along with this good man, and to cast in my lot with him. But, my good companion, do you know the way to this desired place? I am directed by a man, whose name is Evange- list, to speed me to a little gate that is before us, where we shall receive instruction about the way.

Come then, good neighbor, let us be going.

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Then they went both together. And I will go back to my place, said Obstinate ; I will be no companion of 'ucli misled, fantastical fellows. Now I saw in my dream, that when Obstinate was gone back Christian and Pliable went talking over the plain; and thus they began their discourse: Come, neighbor Pliable, how do you do?

I am glad you are persuaded to go along with me. Had even Obstinate himself but felt what I have felt of the powers and terrors of what is yet unseen, he would not thus lightly have given us the back. FitTH Reader. Come, neigh lix r Christian, since there are none but us two here, tell me now further what the things are, and how to be enjoyed, whither we are going.

I can better conceive of them with my mind, than speak of them with my tongue: And do you think that tlie words of your book are certainly true? Yes, verily; for it was made by Him that cannot lie. There is an endless kingdom to be inhabited, and everlasting life to be given us, that we may inhabit that kingdom for ever.

Well said ; and what else? There are crowns of glory to be given us, and garments that will make us shine like the sun in the firmament of heaven. There shall be no inore crying, nor sorrow: And what company shall we have there? There we shall be with seraphims and cherubims, creatures that will dazzle your eyes to look on them.

There also you shall meet with thousands and ten thou- sands that have gone before us to that place ; none of them are hurtful, but loving and holy; every one walking in the sight of God, and standing in His presence with acceptance for ever. In a word, there we shall see the elders with their golden crowns ; there we shall see the holy virgins with their golden harps ; there we shall see The hearing: But are these things to be enjoyed?

How shall we get to be sharers thereof? The Lord, the Governor of the country, hath recorded that in this book ; the substance of which is. If we be truly willing to have it, He will bestow it upon us freely. Well, my good companion, glad am I to hear of these things: I cannot go so fast as I would, by reason of this burden that is on my back.

Soon as the woods on shore look dim, ,. We'll sing at St. Ann's our parting hymn. Row, brothers, row, the stream runs fast. The Rapids are near, and the daylight's past! Why should we yet our sail unfurl? There is not a breath the blue wave to curl!

But when the wind blows off the shore, Oh! Blow, hreezes, blow, the stream runs fast. The Rapids are near, and the daylight's past I n t 10 Fifth Reader. IJtawas' tide! Saint of this green Isle! Blow, breezes, blow, the stream runs fast. The llapids are near, and the daylight's past! We shall have plenty of time. Bob Sawyer. Winkle," said Arabella.

A third young lady said it was elegant, and a fouith expressed her opinion that it was " swan-like. Winkle, reddening; " but I have no skates. Trundle had got a couple of pair, and the fat boy announced that there were half-a-dozen more down stairs, whereat Mr. Winkle expressed excjuisite delight, and looked exquisitely un- comfortable. Woller, having shovelled and swept away the snow which had fallen on it during the night, Mr.

Bob Sawyer adjusted his skates with a dex- terity which to Mr. Winkle was perfectly marvellous, and described circles with his left leg, and cut figures of eight ; and inscribed upon the ice, without once stopping for breath, a great many other pleasant and astonishing devices, to the excessive satisfaction of Mr.

Pickwdck, Mr. Tupman, and the ladies; which reached a pitch of positive enthusiasm when old Wardle and Benjamin Allen, assisted by the aforesaid Bob Sawyer, performed some mystic evoluti jns, which they call a reel. All this time, Mr. Winkle, with his face and hands blue witli the cold, had been forcing a gimlet into the soles of his feet, and putting his skates on, with the points behind, and getting the straps into a very complicated and en- tangled state, with the assistance of Mr.

Snodgrass, who knew ratlier less about skates than a Hindoo. At length, however, with the assistance of Mr. Weller, the unfor- tunate skates were firmly screwed and buckled on, and Mr. Winkle was raised to his feet. Winkle, trembling violently, and clutching hold of Sam's arms wdth the grasp of a drowning man. Weller's bore reference to a demonstration Mr.

Winkle made at the instant, of a frantic desire to throw his feet in the air, and dash the back of his head on the ice. Winkle, with a ghastly smile. Winkle, clinging most affectionately to JVIr. You may have them, Sam. Winkle, hastily. I meant to have given you five shillings this morning for a Christmas-box, Sam. I'll give it you this afternoon, Sam.

I shall soon get in the way of it, Sam. Not too fast, Sam ; not too fast. Winkle, stooping forward, with his body half doubled up, was being assisted over the ice by Mr. Weller, in a very singular and un -swan-like manner, when Mr. Pickwick most innocently shouted from the opposite bank — " Sam! The Pickwickians on Ice.

Id , they, , sir, iHcious ladies smile. I want you. Weller disengaged himself from the grasp of the agonized Piekwiekian ; and, in so doing, administered a considerable impetus to the un- happy Mr, Winkle. With an accuracy which no degree of dexterity or practice could have insured, that unfor- tunate gentleman hove swiftly down into the centre of the reel, at the very moment when Mr.

Bob Sawyer was performing a flourish of unparalleled beauty. Winkle struck wildly against him, and with a loud crash they Ijoth fell heavily down. Pickwick ran to the spot. Bob Sawyer had risen to his feet, but Mr. Winkle was far t X wise to do anything of the kind in skates. He was seated on the ice, making spasmodic eflbrts to smile; but anguish was depicted on every lineament of his countenance.

Benjamin Allen, with great anxiety. Winkle, rubbing his back very hard. Benjamin with great eagerness. Winkle, hurriedly. Winkle ; " I'd rather not. Pickwick was excited and indignant. He beckoned to Mr. Weller, and said in a stern voice, " Take his skates off. Pickwick, firmly. The command was not to be resisted.

Winkle allowed Sam to obey it, in silence. Sam assisted him to rise. Winkle, startinty. I will speak plainer, if you wish it. An impostor, sir. Pickwick turned slowly on his heel, and rejoined his friends. While Mr. Pickwick was delivering himself of the sentiment just recorded, Mr.

Weller and the fat boy, having by their joint endeavors cut out a slide, were exercising themselves thereupon, in a very masterly and brilliant manner. Sam Weller, in particular, was dis- playing that beautiful feat of fancy sliding which is currently denominated " knocking at the cobbler's door," and which is achieved by skimming over the ice on one foot, and occasionally giving a two-penny postman's knock upon it with the other.

It was a good long slide, and there was something in the motion which Mr. Pick- wick, who was very cold with standing still, could not help envying. Pickwick," cried all the ladies. Pickwick, "but I haven't done such a thing these thirty years. Weller, and l eat the fat boy all to nothing. Pickwick paused, considered, pulled oft' his gloves and put them in his hat, took two or three short runs, baulked himself as often, and at last took another run and went slowly and gravely down the slide, with his feet about a yard and a quarter apart, amidst the gi'atified shouts of all the spect.

Pickwick, and then Sam, and then Mr. Winkle, and then Mr. Bob Sawyer, and then the fat boy, and then Mr. Snodgrass, following closely upon each other's heels, and ruruiing after each other with as nuich eagerness as if all theii- future pros- pects in life depended on their expedition. It was the most intensely interesting thing, to observe the manner in which Mr.

Pickwick performed his share 16 Finn Reader. It in the ceremony: And when he was knocked down which happened upon the average every third round , it was the most invigorating sight that can possibly be imagined, to behold him gather up his hat, gloves, and handkerchief, with a glowing countenance, and resume his station in the rank, with an ardor and enthusiasm which nothing; could abate.

The sport was at its height, the sliding was at the quickest, the laughter was at the loudest, when a sharp smart crack was heard. There was a quick rush towards the bank, a wild scream from the ladies, and a shout from Mr. A large mass of ice disappeared, the water bubbled up over it, and Mr.

Pickwick's hat, gloves, and handkerchief were floating on the surface ; and this was all of Mr. Pickwick that anybody could see. Dismay ;ind anguish were depicted on every counten- ance; the males turned pale, and the females fainted; Mr. Snodgrass and Mr. Winkle grasped each other by the hand, and gazed at the spot where their leader had gone down, with frenzied eagerness; while Mr.

Tupman, by way of rendering the promptest assistance. Thk Pickwickians on Ice. Benjamin Allen was holding a hurried consulta- tion with Mr. Winkle, deeply affected. Pickwick- had declined to keep liimself up for anylxxly else's sake, it would have occurred to him that he might as well do HO for his own.

Pickwick, wringing the water from his head and face, and gasping for bieath. I couldn't get on my feet at first. Pickwick's coat as was yet visible, bore testimony to the accuracy of this state- ment ; and as the fears of the spectators were still further relieved by the fat boy's suddenly recollecting that the water was nowiiere more than five feet deep, 18 Fifth Reader.

After a vast quantity of splasliiiig, and cracking, and struggling, Mr. Pickwick was at length fairly extricated from his unpleasant position, and once more stood on dry land. Pick- wick was wrapped up, and started off, under the guidance of Mr. Weller ; presenting the singular phenomenon of an elderly gentleman dripping wet, and without a hat, with liis arms bound down to his sides, skimming over the ground without any clearly defined purpose, at the rate of six good English miles an liour.

We live in deeds, not'years ; in th u,i? We should count time by heart-throbs, when they l eat For God, for man, for duty. He most lives, Who thinks mo,-5t, feels the noblest, acts the best. Life's but a means unto the end— that end, Begimiing, mean, and end to all things, God. For the strength of the hills we bless Thee, Our God, our fathers' God! Thou hast made thy children mighty, By the touch of the mountain-sod.

Thou hast fixed our ark of refuge Where the spoihr's foot ne'er trod ; For the strength of the hills we bless Thee, Our God, our fathers' God! For the dark resounding caverns, Where thy still, small voice is heard ; For the strong pines of the forests. That by thy breath are stirred ; For the storms, on whose free pinions Thy spirit walks abroad ; For the strength of the hills we bless Thee, Our God, our fathers' God 1 20 Fifth Reader.

Our God, our fathers' God! For the shadow of thy presence, Round our camp of rock outspread ; For the stern defiles of battle. Bearing record of our dead ; For the snows and for the torrents. For the free heart's burial-sod ; For the strength of the hills we bless Thee, Our God, our fathers' God!

Hemans Get not your friends by bare compliments, but by giving them sensible tokens of your love. It is well worth while to learn how to win the lieart of a man in the right way. Force is of no use to make or preserve a friend, who is an animal, that is never caught nor tamed but by kindness and pleasure.

Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. One moonlight winter's evening I called upon Beethoven, for I wanted him to take a walk, and afterward sup with me. In passing through some dark, narrow street, he paused suddenly. It is from my sonata in F! The player went on ; but in the midst of the finale there was a sudden break, then the voice of sobbing.

It is so beautiful, it is utterly beyond my power to do it justice. Oh, what would I not ffive to o-o to the concert at Colojnie! We can scarcely pay our rent. But it is of no use. I will play to her, and she will understand it. A pale young man was sitting by the table, making shoes; and near him, leaning sorrowfully upon an old- fashioned harpsichord, sat a young girl, with a profusion of light hair falling over her bent face.

Both were cleanly but very poorly dressed, and both started and turned toward us as we entered. I am a musician. Then you play by ear? During the summer evenings her windows were generally open, and I walked to and fro outside to listen to her. He had no sooner struck the first chord than I knew what would follow — how grand he would be that night.

And I was not mistaken. The brother and sister were silent with wonder and rapture. The former laid aside his work ; the latter, with her head bent slightly forward, and her hands pressed tightly over her breast, crouched down near the end of the harpsichord, as if fearful lest even the beating of her heart should break the flow of those magical, sweet sounds.

It was as if we wert; all bound in a strange dream, and only feared to wake. Suddenly the flame of the single candle wavered, sank, flickered, and went out. Beethoven paused, and I threw open the shutters, admitting a flood of brilliant moon- light. The room was almost as light as before, and the illumination fell strongest upon the piano and player.

But tlie chain of his ideas seemed to have been broken by the accident. His head dropped upon his breast ; his hands rested upon his knees; he seemed absorbed in meditation. It was thus for some time. At length the young shoemaker rose, and approached him eagerly, yet reverently. A cry of delight and recognition burst from them both, and exclaiming, " Then you are Beethoven!

He rose to go, but we held him back with entreatiea " Play to us once more-— only once more! He suffered himself to be led back to the instrument. The moon shone brightly in through the window and lit up his glorious, rugged head and massive figure. Then his hands dropped on the keys, and he began playing a sad and infinitely lovely movement, which crept gently over the instrument like the calm flow of moonlight over the dark earth.

This was followed by a wild, elfin passage in triple time — a sort of grotesque interlude, like the dance of sprites upon tlie sward. Then came a swift agitato finale — a breathless, hurrying, trembling movement, descriptive of flight and uncertainty, and vague, impul- sive terror, which carried us away on its rustling wings, and left us all in emotion and wonder.

He paused, and looked compassionately, almost ten- derly, at the face of the blind girl. I will soon come again! And this was the origin of that moonlight sonata with which we are all so fondly acquainted. The 8 N i ok the Camp. Tnere was a pause. They sang of love, and not of fame ; Forgot was Ihitain's glory; Each heart recalled a different name.

But all sang "Annie Lawrie. Dear girl, her name he dared not speak. But, as the song grew louder. Something upon the soldier's cheek Washed off the stains of powder. Jieyond tlie flarkening ocean burned The bloody sunset's enil ers, While the Crimean valleys learned How English love reniemljers.

And once again a fire of hell llained on the Russian cjuai-ters, With scream of shot — and burst of sliell, And bellowing of the mortars. When Gilliatt awoke he was huiiOTv. The sea was growing calmer. Although pressed by hunger, he began by stripping himself of his wet clothing, — the only means of getting warmth.

His overcoat, jacket, overalls, and sheepskin he spread out and fixed with large round stones here and there. Then he thought of eating. He had recourse to his knife, which he was careful to sharpen, and to keep always in good condition, and he detached from the rocks a few limpets. He took advan- tage of the receding tide to wander among the rocks in k TiiK Demon ok the Deep.

At low water the crabs are accustoiiuKl to crawl out into the air. On this day, however, the cray-iish and crabs were both lacking ; the tempest had driven them into their solitary retreats, and th ;y had not yet mustered C 3urage to venture abroad. As he was determinini; to content himself with the sea- urchins, a little clattering noise at his feet aroused his attention.

He chased it along the base of the rock. Suddenly it was gone. It had buried itself in some crevice under the rock. Gilliatt clutched the projections of the rock, and stretched out to observe where it shelved away under the water. As he suspected, there was an opening there in which the creature had evidently taken refuge.

It was a kind of porch. The sea entered beneath it, but was not deep. The bottom was visible, covered with large pebbles. Holding his knife between his teeth, Gilliatt descended, by the help of feet and hands, from the upper part of the escarpment, and leaped into the water. It reached almost to his shoulders. He made his way through the porch, and found himself in a blind passage, with a roof in the form of a rude arch over his head.

The walls were polished and slippery. The crab was nowhere visible. At alxnit fifteen paces the vhuIUkI root' ended overliead. His vision be- came clearer. He saw before his eyes another vaulted roof, and at the farther end an altar-like stone. Near the moulded arch he saw low dark grottoes within tlu; cavern.

The entrance to the nearest was out of the water, and easily approachable. Nearer still than this recess, he noticed above the level of the water and within reach of his hand a horizontal fissure. It seemed to him probable that the crab had taken refuge there, and he plunged his hand in as far as he was able, and groped about in that dusky aperture.

Suddenly he felt himself seized by the arm. A strange, indescribable horror thrilled through him. Some living thing — thin, rough, fiat, cold, slimy — had twisted itself round his naked arm, in the dark depth below, it crept upward towards his chest. Its pressure was like a tightening cord, its steady persistence like that of a screw.

In less than a moment some mysterious spiral form had passed round his wrist and elbow, and had reached his shoulder. A sharp point penetrated beneath the arm-pit. Gilliatt recoiled, but he had scarcely power to move. He was, as it were, nailed to the place. With his left hand he seized his knife, which he still held between his teeth, and wath that hand holding the knife he supported himself against the rocks, while he made a desperate efTort to withdraw his arm.

It was supple as leather, strong as steel, cold as night. A second form — sharp, elongated, and narrow — IssikmI out of the crevice, like a tongue out of monstrous jaws. It seemed to lick his naked body ; then, suddenly stretch- ing out, became longer and thinner, as it crept over his skin and wound itself round him. At the same time a terrible sense of pain, comparable t j nothing he had ever known, compelled all his muscles to contract.

He felt ujKMi his skin a number of Hat, rounded points. It seemed as if innunierable suckers had fastened to his fhish and were alxjut to drink his blood. Agony when at its height is unite: Gilliatt uttered no cry. There was sufficient light for him to see the repulsive forms which had entangled themselves about him. A fourth ligature — but this one swift as an arrow — darted towards his stomach, and wound around him there.

It was impossibhi to sever or tear away the slimy bands which were twisted tightly round his Ixjdy, and were adhering by a number of points. Eacli of the points was the focus of frightful and singular pangs. It was as if numberless small mouths were devouring him at the same time. A fifth long, slimy, riband-shaped strip issued from the hole.

It passed over the others, and wound itself tightly round his chest. The compression increased his sufferings ; he could scarcely breathe. These living hongs were pointed at their extremities, but broadened like the blade of a sword towards its hilt.

On the opposite side of tliis distrusting monster appeared tlie commencement of three other tentacles, the! In the middles of this slimy mass appeared two eyes. The eyes were fixed on lilliatt. He recomiized the devil-fish. It is difficult for those who have not seen it, to believe in the existence of the devil-fish.

If terror were th! The octopus is the sea-vam- pire. Gilliatt had thrust his arm deep into the opening ; the monster had snapped at it. He was in the water up to his belt ; his naked feet clutching the slippery roundness of the h age stones at the bottom ; his right arm bound and rendered powerless by the flat- coils of the long tentacles of the creature, and his body almost hidden under the 'I'm: Gilliatt had but one re- source, — his knife.

His left hand only was free; his open knife was in this hand. The antenna of the devil- fish cannot be cut ; it is a leathery substance, impossible to divide with the knife, — it slips under the edge. Its position in attack also is such that to cut it would be to wound the victim's own flesh.

The creature is formid- able, but there is a way of resisting it. The cephalopod, in fact, is vulnerable only through the head. Gilliatt was not ignorant of this fact. With the octopus there is a certain moment in the conflict wdiich must be seized. It is the instant when the devil-fish advances its head.

The movement is rapid. He who loses that moment is destroyed. The things we have described occupied only a few mom nts. Gilliatt felt the increasing power of its innumerable suckers. He grasped his knife and looked at the monster, which seemed to look at him. Suddenly it loosened from the rock its sixth antenna, and, darting i -i- J Mitmmmjm. At the same moment it advanced its head with a violent movement.

In one second more its mouth would have fastened on his breast. Bleeding in the sides, and with his two arms entangled, he would have been a dead man. But Gilliatt was watchful. He avoided the antenna, and at the moment when the monster darted forward to fasten on his breast, lie struck it with the knife clenched in his left hand. There were two convulsions in opposite directions, — that of the devil-fish and that of its prey.

The movement was rapid as a double flash of liglitning. He had plunged the blade of his knife into the flat, slimy substance, and by a rapid movement, like the flourish of a whip in the air, describing a circle round the two eyes, he wrenched the head oft' as a man would draw a tooth. The struggle was ended. The folds relaxed; the monster dropped away, like the slow detaching of liands; the four hundred suckers, deprived of their sustaining- power, dropped at once from the man and the rock.

The mass sank to the bottom of the water. The UKjuster was quite dead. Gilliatt closed his knife. I see the lights of the village Gleam through the rain and the mist, And a feeling of sadness comes o'er me That my soul cannot resist: A feeling of sadness and longing, That is not akin to pain, And resembles sorrow only As the mist resembles the rain.

Come, read to me some poem, Seme simple and heartfelt lay. That shall soothe this restless feeling. And banish the thoughts of day. Not from the grand old masters. Not from the bards sublime, Whovse distant footsteps echo Through the corridors of Time. For, like strains of martial music, Their mighty thoughts suggest Life's endless toil and endeavor ; And to-night I long for rest.

Head from some humbler poet. Still heard in his soul the music Of wonderful melodies. Such songs have power to juiet The restless pulse of care. And come like the l ene liction That follows after prayer. Then read from the treasured volume The poem of thy choice, And lend to the rhyme of the poet The beauty of thy voice.

And the night shall be filled with music, And the cares, that infest the day. Shall fold their tents, like the Arabs, And as silently steal away. On the fifth day of the moon, which, according to the custom of my forefathers, I always keep holy, after hav- ing washed myself, and offered up my morning devotions, I ascended to the high hills of Bagdad, in order to pass the rest of the day in meditation and prayer.

As I was here airing myself on the tops of the mountains, I fell into a profound contemplation on the vanity of human life ; and passing from one thought to another, " Surely," said I, " man is but a shadow, and life a dream. As I looked upon him, he applied it to his lips, and began to play upon it.

The sound of it was exceeding sweet, and wrought into a variety of tunes that were inexpressibly melodious, and altogether different from anything I had ever heard: My heart melted away in secret raptures. I had been often told that the rock before me was the haunt of a genius, and tliat several had been entertained with that nnisic who had passed by it, but never heard that the musician had before made himself visible.

When he had raised my thoughts by those transport- ing airs which he played to taste the pleasures of his conversation, as I looked upon him like one astonished, lie beckoned to me, and by the waving of his hand, directed me to approach to the place where he sat. I drew near with that reverence which is due to a superior nature ; and as my heart was entirely subdued by the captivating strains I had heard, I fell down at his feet and wept.

The genius smiled upon me with a look of compassion and atf ability that familiarized him to my imagination, and at once dispelled all the fears and apprehensions with which I approached him. He lifted me from the gi'ound, and taking me by the hand, " Mirza," said he, " I have heard thee in thy soliloquies ; follow me. As I was counting the arches, the genius told me that this bridge first consisted of a thousand arches ; but that a great fl X d swept away the rest, and left the bridge in the ruinous condition I now beheld it.

Ther,e hidden pit-falls were set very thick at the entrance of the bridge, so that throngs of people no sooner broke through the cloud but many of them fell into them. They grew thinner to- wards the middle, but multiplied and lay closer together towards the end of the arches that were entire. I passed some time in the contemplation of this won- derful structure, and the great variety of objects which it presented.

My heart was filled with a deep melan- choly, to see several dropping unexpectedly in the midst of mirth and jollity, and catching at everything that stood by them to save themselves ; some were looking up towards the heavens in a thoughtful posture, and in the midst of a speculation stund led and fell out of sight; nmltitudes were busy in the pursuit of bubbles, that glittered in their eyes, and danced before them, but often when they thought themselves within the reach of them, their footing failed, and down they sunk.

In this con- fusion of objects I observed some with seimetars in their hands, who ran to and fro upon the bridge, thrusting several persons upon trap-doors which did not seem to lie in their way, and which they might have escaped had they not been thus forced upon thtan. The genius seeing me indulge myself in this melan- choly prospect, told me I liad dwelt long enough upon it.

I here fetched a deep sigh: The clouds still rested on one half of it, insomuch that I could dis- cover nothing in it ; but the other appeared to me a vast ocean, planted with innumerable islands that were covered with fruits and flowers, and interwoven with a thousand little shining seq-s that ran among them.

I could see persons dressed in glorious habits, with gar- lands upon their heads, passing among the trees, lying down by the side of fountains, or resting on beds of flowers, and could hear a confused harmony of singing birds, falling waters, human voices, and musical instruments.

Gladness grew in me at the discovery of so delightful a scene. I wished for the wings of an eagle, that I might fly away to those happy seats ; but the genius told me there was no passage to them, except through the gates of death that I saw opening every moment The Vision of Mikza. These are the man- sions of good men after death, who, according to tue degree and kinds of virtue in which they excelled, are distributed among fchese several islands, which ab jund with pleasures of different kinds and degrees, suitable to the relishes and perfections of those who are settled in them; every island is a paradise, accommodated to its respective inhabitants.

Are not these, O Mirza, habita- tions worth contending for? Does life appear miserable, that gives thee opportunities of earning such a reward? Is death to be feared, that wiH convey thee to so happy an existence? Think not man was made in vain, who lias such an eternity reserved for him. At length said I, " Show me now, I beseech tlice, the secrets that lie hid under those dark clouds which cover the ocean, on the other side of the rock of adamant.

I then turned again to the vision I had been so long contemplating; but instead of the rolling tide, the arched bridge, nnd tlie happy islands, I saw nothing but the long, hollow valley of Bagdad, with oxen, sheep, and camels grazing upon the sides of it. The Minstrol-boy to the war is gone, Tn the ranks of death you'll find him ; His father's sword he has girded on, And his wild harp slung behind him.

For he tore its chords asunder ; And said, " No chains shall sully thee, I'liou soul of love and bravery! Thy songs were made for the brave and free. They shall never sound in slavery! One day when I went out to my wood-pile, or rather my pile of stumps, I observed two large ants, the one red, the other much larger, nearly half an inch long, and black, fiercely contending with one another.

Having once got hold, they never let go, but struggled and wrestled and rolled on the chips incessantly. Looking further, I was surprised to find that the chips were covered with such combatants; that it was not a The Battle of the Ants. The legions of these myrmi- dons covered all the hills and vales in my wood-yard, and the gi'ound was already strewn with the dead and dying, both red and black.

It was the only battle-field which I have ever witnessed, the only battle-field I ever trod while the battle was raging: On every side they were engaged in deadly combat, yet without any noise that I could hear; and human soldiers never fought so resolutely. I watched a couple that were fast locked in each other's embrace, in a little sunny valley amid the chips, now at noonday prepared to fight till tlie sun went down or life went out.

The smaller red champion had fastened him- self like a vice to his adversary's front, and through all the tumblings on that field never for an instant ceased to gnaw at one of his feelers near the root, having already caused the other to go by the board ; while the stronger black one dashed him from side to side, and, as I saw on looking nearer, had already Jiivested him of several of his members.

They fought with more pertinacity than bull-dogs. Neither manifested the least disposition to retreat. It was evident that their battle-cry was " Conquer, or die! Or perchance he was Honie AehilleH, who had nourished his wrath apart, and had now come to avenge or rescue his Patroclus.

He saw this Tni ' ual c nd at from afar — for the blacks were nearly twice tlie size of the reds. He drew near with rapid pace till he stood on liis guard within half an inch of the cond atants ; then, watching his opportunity, he sprang upon the black warrior, and connnenced his operations near the root of his right fore leg, leaving the foe to select among his own members ; and so there were three united for life, as if a new kind of attraction had been invented which put all otlier locks and cements to shame.

I should not have wondered by this time to find that they had their respective nnisical bands stationed on some eminent chip, and playing their national airs the while, to excite the slow and cheer the dying combatants. I was myself excited somewhat, even as if they had been men.

The more you think of it, the less the difierence. And certainly there is not the fight recorded in Concord history at least, if in the history of America, that will bear a moment's comparison with this, whevher for the numbers engaged in it, or for the patriotism and heroism displayed. For numbers and for carnage it was an Austerlitz or Dresden.

I have no doubt it was a principle they fought for, as much as our ancestors, and not to avoid a three- penny tax on their tea; and the results of this battle will be as 'mportant and memorable to those whom it concerns as those of the battle of Bunker Hill, at least. I took up the chip on which the three I have particu- larly described were struggling, carried it into my house, and placed it under a tumbler on my window-sill, in The Battle of the Ants.

I raised the glass, and he went off over the window-sill in that crippled state. Whether he finally survived that combat, and spent the remainder of his days in some Hotel des Tnvalides, I do not know ; but I thought his industry would not be worth much thereafter. I never learned which party was victorious, nor the cause of the war; but 1 felt for the rest of that day as if I had had my feelings excited and harrowed by witnessing the struggle, the ferocity and carnage, of a human battle before my door.

Of all tlid rules since the birth of tiiiu? Old Floyd Ireson, for his hard heai-t. Tarred and feathered and carried in a cart By the women of Marblehead! Body of turkey, head of owl, Wings a-droop like a rained-on fowl, Feathered and ruffled in every part, Skipper Ireson stood in the cart.

Scores of women, old and young, Strong of muscle, and glib of tongue, Pushed and pulled up the rocky lane. Shouting and singing the shrill refrain: Girls in bloom of cheek and lips. Hrag of your catch of fish again! Old Floyd Ireson, for his hard heart. Tarred and feathered and cari'ied in a cart By the women of Marblehead!

Fathoms deep in dark Chaleur That wreck shall lie for evermore. Mother and sister, wife and maid, Tiooked from the rocks of Marblehead Over the moaning and rainy sea, — TiOoked for the coming that might not l e! What did the winds and the sea-birds say Of the cruel captain who sailed away? Through the street, on either side, ITp flew windows, doors swung wide ; Sha p-tongued spinsters, old wives gray, Treble lent the fish-horn's bray.

Sea-worn grandsires, cripple-bound, u 46 Fifth Reader. Hullcs of old sailors run aground, Shook head, and fist, and hat, and cane. Little the wicked skipper knew Of the fields so green and the sky so blue. Riding there in his sorry trim. What is the sname that clothes the skin To the nameless horror that lives within?

Waking or sleeping, I see a wreck. And hear a cry from a reeling deck! Hate me and curse me, — I only dread The hand of God and the face of the dead! Tarred and feathered and carried in a cart By the woraeii of Marblehead! The burning sun of Syria had not yet attained its highe. The warlike pilgrim had toiled among cliffs and preci- pices during the earlier part of the morning; more lately, issuing from those rocky and dangerous defiles, he had entered upon that great plain, where the accursed cities provoked, in ancient days, the direct and dreadful ven- geance of the Onmipotent.

The toil, the thirst, the dangers of the way, were for- gotten, as the traveller recalled the fearful catastrophe, which had convi'rted into an arid and dismal wilderness the fair and fertile valley of Siddim, once well watered, even as the Garden of the Lord, now a parched and blighted waste, C jndenmed to eternal sterility. Crossing himself, as he viewed tlie dark mass of rolling waters, in color as in quality unlike those of every other lake, the traveller shuddered as he remembered that beneath these sluggish waves lay the once proud cities of the plain, whose gi-ave was dug by the thunder of the heavens, or the eruption of subterraneous fire, and whcjse remains were hid, even by that sea which h jlds no living fish in its bosom, bears no skiff on its surface, and, as if its own dreadful bed were the only fit receptacle for its sullen waters, sends not, like other lakes, a tribute to the ocean.

The whole land around, as in the days of Moses, was " brimstone and salt ; it is not sown, nor beareth, nor any grass gi'oweth thereon " ; the land as well as the lake might be termed dead, as producing nothing having resemblance to vegetation, and even the very air was entirely devoid of its ordinary winged inhabitants, de- terred probably by the odor of bitumen and sulphur, which the burning sun exhaled from the waters of the lake, in steaming clouds, frequently assuming the appear- ance of waterspouts.

Masses of the slimy and sulphurous substance called naphtha which floated idly on the slug- gish Lad sullen waves, supplied those rolling clouds with new vapors, and afforded awful testimony to the truth of the Mosaic history. Upon this scene of desolation the sun shone with almost intolerable splendor, and all living natui-e seemed to have hidden itself from the rays, excepting the solitary figure which moved through the flittings and at a foot's pace, and appeared the sole breathing thing on the wide surface of the plain.

The dress of the rider and the accoutre- ments of his horse were peculiarly unfit for the traveller in such a country. A coat of linked mail, with long The Crusader and the Saracen. His lower limbs were sheathed, like his body, in flexible mail, securing the legs and thighs, while the feet rested in plated shoes, which corresponded with the gauntlets. A long, broad, straight- shaped, double-edged falchion, with a handle formed like a cross, corresponded with a stout poniard on the other side.

To this cumbrous equipment must be added a surcoat of embroidered cloth, much frayed and worn, which was thus far useful, that it excluded the burning rays of the sun from the armor, which they would otherwise have rendered intolerable to the wearer.

The surcoat bore, in several places, the arms of the owner, although much defaced. These seemed to be a couchant leopard, with the motto, " I sleep — wake me not. The flat top of his cumbrous cylindrical helmet was unadorned with any crest. In retaining their own unwieldy defensive armor, the northern Crusaders seemed to set at defiance the nature of the climate and country to which they had come to war.

The accoutrements of the horse were scarcely less massive and unwieldy than those of the rider. The animal had a heavy saddle plated with steel, uniting in front with a species of breastplate, and behind witli defensive armor made to cover the loins. Then there was a steel axe, called a mace-of-arms, and which hung to the saddle-bow ; the reins were secured by chain-work, and the front-stall of the bridle was a steel plate, with apertures for the eyes and nostrils, having in the midst a short sharp pike, projecting from the forehead of the horse like the horn of the fabulous unicorn.

But habit had made the endurance of this load of panoply a second nature, both to the knight and his gallant charger. Numbers, indeed, of the Western war- riors, who hurried to Palestine, died ere they became inured to the burning climate ; but there were others to whom that climate became innocent and even friendly, and among this fortunate number was the solitary horse- man who now traversed the border of the Dead Sea.

Nature, which cast his lind: His disposition seemed, in some degree, to partake of the qualities of his bodily frame; and as the one possessed great strength and endurance, united with the power of violent exertion, the other, under a calm and undisturbed semblance, had much of the fiery and enthusiastic love of glory which constituted the principal attribute of the re- nowned Norman line, and had rendered them sovei'eigns J The Crusader and the Saracen.

The small train which had followed him from his native country, had been gradually diminished, ns tlie means of maintaining them, disappeared, and his only remaining s pnre was at present on a sick-bed, and unable to attend his master, who travelled, as we have seen, singly and alone.

Nature, had, however her demands for refreshment and repose, even on the iron f ramie and patient disposition of the Knight of the Sleeping Leopard ; and at noon, when the Dead Sea lay at some distance on his right, he joyfully hailed the sight of two or three palm-trees, which arose beside the well which was assigned for his nud-day station.

As the Knight of the Couchant Leopard continued to fix his eyes attentively on the yet distant cluster of palm-trees, it seemed to him as if some object was moving among them. The distant form separated itself from the trees, which partly hid its motions, and advanced towards the knight with a speed which soon showed a mounted horseman, whom his turban, long spear, and green caftan floating in the wind, on his nearer approach, showed to be a Saracen cavalier.

He disengaged his lance from his saddle, seized it with the right hand, placed it in rest with its point half elevated, gathered up the reins in the left, waked his liorse's mettle with the spin', and prepared to encounter the stranger with the calm self-confidence belonging to the victor in many contests. Cl ia; th I 41 an 1 The Crusader and the Saracen.

His own long spear was not couched or levelled like that of his antagonist, but grasped by the middle with his right hand, and brandished at ai-ni's length above his head. As the cavalier approached his enemy at full career, he seemed to expect that the Knight of the Leopard should put his horse to the gallop to encounter him. But the Christian knight, well acquainted with the customs of Eastern warriors, did not mean to exhaust his good horse by any unnecessary exertion ; and, on the contrary, made a dead halt, confident that if the enemy advanced to the actual shock, his own weight, and that of his powerful charger, would give him sufficient advantage, without the additional momentum of rapid motion.

Ecjually sensible and apprehensive of such a probable result, the Saracen cavalier, when he had approached towai-ds the Christian within twice the length of his lance, wheeled his steed to the left with inimitable dexterity, and rode twice round his antagonist, who, turning without quitting his ground, and presenting his front constantly to his enemy, frustrated his attempts to attack him on an unguarded point ; so that the Saracen, wheeling his horse, was fain to retreat to the distance of an hundred yards.

A second time, like a hawk attacking a heron, the Heathen renewed the charge, and a second time was fain to retreat without coming to a close struggle. Ere the Christian could avail himself of this mishap, his nimble foeman spnnig from the ground, and calling on his horse, which instantly returned to liis side, he leaped into his seat without touching the stirrup, and regained all the advantage of which the Knight of the Leopard hoped to deprive him.

Planting his long spear in the sand at a distance from the scene of combat, he strung, with great address, a short bow, which he carried at his back, and putting his horse to the gallop, once more described two or three circles of a wider extent than formerly, in the course of which he discharged six arrows at the Christian with such unerring skill, that the goodness of his harness alone saved him from being wounded in as many places.

The seventh shaft apparently found a less perfect part of the armor, and the Christian dropped heavily from his horse. But what was the surprise of the Saracen, when, dismounting to examine tlie condition of his prostrate enemy, he found himself suddenly within the grasp of the European, who had had recourse to this artifice to bring his enemy within his reach!

He unloosed the sword-belt, in of The Chusadeh axd the Saracen. But in tlie last encounter the Saracen had lost his sword and his piiver of arrows, both of which were attached to the girdle, which he was obliged to abandon. He had also lost his turban in the struggle.

These disiidvantages seemed to incline the Moslem to a truce: And now wend we to yonder fountain, f jr the lioiir of rest is at hand, and the stream liad liardly touched my lip when I was called to battle by thy approach. To horse, trot, gallop, and out with each blade. To-day, Lads, we ride on a dare-devil raid ; 'Tis death, or a halo that never shall rade.

An Array o'erhanging us, in the death-hush Massed, like an AvaUnche crowded to crush ; Up at them, pierce them, ere on us they rush! Old England for Ever, Hurrah! Stick to old Scarlett, Lads! See how he goes In for a near-sighted look at our foes: Faster, men, faster, or singly he'll close! Chariots of fire in the dark of death stand, With crowns for the foremost who fall for their land My God, what a time ere we meet hand to hand!

Scaklk'it's Thukk Hindkkd. Old England for Plver, 1 1 unah! There's fear in their faces ; they shrink from the shock ; They will open the ioor, only loud enough knock ; Keep turning the key, lest we stick in the lock! Old England for Ever, Hun ah! Well done! Soul and steel alike trusty and true!

By Thousands they faced our invincible Few ; Like sand in a sieve you have riddled them through. Charge back! Once again we must ride the Death-ride, Torn, tattered, but smiling with something of pride: Charge home: One cheer for the living!

One cheer for the dead! One cheer for the deed on that hill-side red! The glory is gathered for England's proud head! Mnrat went forward, and entered tlie gates witli his splendid cavalry; but as he pass Ml through the streets, lie was struck ] y the soli- tude that surroundtMl him. As night drew its curtain over the splendid capital. Napoleon entered tlie gates, and innnediately appointed Mortier governor.

In his directions he connnanded him to abstain from all pillage. Defend Moscow against nW, whether friend or foe. The weary soldiers sunk to rest, but there was no sleep for Mortier's eyes. Not tlie gorgeous and variegated palaces and their rich ornaments, nor the parks and gardens and Oriental magnificence that everywhere surrounded him, kept him wakeful, but the ominous foreboding that some dire calamity was hanging over the silent capital.

When he entered it, scarcely a living soul met his gaze as he looked down the long streets ; and when he broke open the buildings, he found parlors and bedrooms and cham- The BuKNiNG of Moscow. The nddnight moon was setting over the city, when the cry of " Fire!

Mortier, as governor of tlu; city, innnediately issued his orders, and was putting forth every exertion, when at daylight Napoleon hastened to him. Affecting to dis- believe the reports that the inhabitants were firing their own city, he put more rigid conunands on Mortier, to keep the soldiers from the work of destruction. The Marshal simply pointed to some iron-covered houses that had not yet been opened, from every crevice of which smoke was issuing like steam from the sides of a pent-up volcano.

Sad and thoughtful, Napoleon turned towards the Kremlin, the ancient palace of the Czars, whose huge structure rose high above the surrounding edifices. In the morning, Mortier, by gi'eat exertions, was enabled to subdue the fire ; but the next night, Sep- tember 1. The dread scene was now fairly opened. Fiery balloons were seen dropping from the air and lighting on the houses ; dull explosions were heard on every side from the shut-up dwellings ; and the next moment light biu-st forth, and the flames were raging through the apartments.

All was uproar and confusion. Flames arose on every side, blazing and crackling in the storm ; while clouds of smoke and sparks, in an incessant shower, went driving toward the Kremlin. The clouds themselves seemed turned into fire, rolling wrath over devoted Moscow. Mortier, crushed with the responsibility thrown upon his shoulders, moved with his Young Guard amid this deso- lation, blowing up the houses and facing the tempest and the flames, struggling nobly to arrest the conflagi'ation.

He hastened from place to place amid the ruins, his face blackened with smoke, and his hair and eyebrows singed with the fierce heat. At length the day dawned, — a day of tempest and of flame, — and Mortier, who had strained every nerve for thirtv-six hours, entered a palace and dropped down from fatigue. The manly form and stalwart arm that h". But the night of tempest had been succeeded by a day of tempest ; and when night again enveloped the city, it was one broad flame, waving to and fro in the blast.

The wnnd had increased to a perfect hurricane, and shifted from quarter to quarter, as if on purpose to swell the sea of fire and extinguish the last hope. The fire was approaching the Kreudin ; and already the roar of the flames and crash of falling houses, and the crackling ol burning timbers, were borne to the ears of the startled Emperor.

He arose and walked to and fro, stopping convulsively and gazing on the terrific scene. Murat, Eugene, and Berthier rushed into his pre8env. But at length the shout, "The Kremlin is on fire! He descended into the streets with his staff', and looked about for a way of egi'ess, but the flames blocked every passage. At length they discovered a postern gate, leading to tlie Moskwa, and entered it ; but they had passed still fur- ther into the danger.

Into this he rushed, and amid the crash of falling houses and the raging of the flames, over burning ruins, through clouds of rolling smoke, and between walls of fire, he pressed on. Mortier, relieved from his anxiety for the Emperor, redoubled his efibrts to arrest the conflagration.

His men cheerfully rushed into every danger. Breathing nothing but smoke and ashes; canopied by flame and smoke and cinders ; surrounded by walls of fire, that i'ocked to and fro, and fell, with a crash, amid the blazing ruins, carrying down with them red-hot roofs of iron, — he struggled against an enemy that no boldness could awe or courage overcome.

The continuous roar of the raging hurricane, mingled with that of the flames, was more terrible than tlie thunder of artillery ; and before this new foe, in the midst of this battle of the elements, the awe-struck army stood affrighted and powerless. When night again descended on the city, it presented a spectacle, the like of which was never seen before, and wliich baffles all description.

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Backlinks zijn links die doorverwijzen naar uw website vanaf andere websites. The police were soon notified of the filmed attack. I want to go out there to dominate. Yet wood and steel may do more than Hesh and blood. It seemed as if innunierable suckers had fastened to his fhish and were alxjut to drink his blood. The Minstrel-Boy IJtawas' tide! And certainly there is not the fight recorded in Concord history at least, if in the history of America, that will bear a moment's comparison with this, whevher for the numbers engaged in it, or for the patriotism and heroism displayed.

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